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The existing problems that Chester faces concerning traffic congestion are numerous and varied. They range from dangerous conditions to frequent delays and occur all over the city but mainly in the City Centre (CBD).

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Introduction

The existing problems that Chester faces concerning traffic congestion are numerous and varied. They range from dangerous conditions to frequent delays and occur all over the city but mainly in the City Centre (CBD). A number of solutions have been offered and Chester City Council have adopted lots of these ideas. Although some are believed to have worked, some have definitely not. I believe that some of the solutions, like Park and Ride schemes, which operate by collecting passengers on the edge of the city and dropping them off in the centre, have certainly failed to work, especially on Saturdays (a popular shopping day). My regular experiences of travelling with different Park and Ride services has taught me that it's just as easy to park your car on the edge of the CBD and walk into the centre of Chester than to use these special 'faster' services. I think this is the result of two decisive factors. Firstly, I don't think that there are enough bus lanes and secondly, the dense traffic congestion prevents the buses travelling efficiently at busy times outside the city, although once they enter into the 'no-cars' zone, there progress may be smoother and faster but pedestrians often walk in the centre of the road making it difficult to make smooth and steady progress. ...read more.

Middle

To charge cars to enter the city centre would be unfair, I feel, but if the designated price was not too much and it helped to lessen the problem of Chester's traffic congestion, I think it would be acceptable. Chester City Council should consider this option well, it may cause a number of disputes, but I feel that it would help. Another way to reduce the amount of traffic in and around the city centre would be to use trams as a form of transport. You can find an example of tram-use in Blackpool where thousands of people come to visit the illuminations and attractions along the famous Golden Mile beach every night. They are an effective way to transport people from place to place quickly and efficiently, without queues! This system does have a drawback though - it costs a lot to make the trams and lay them down. However, once they have been set out, they are pollution free - they run off electric power which is relatively inexpensive. I don't feel that this would work in Chester mainly because I don't think there is enough space. -The trams would not be able to journey for long stretches because the densely packed shops and roads provide little, is any space. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is a reasonable solution that isn't expensive and doesn't present any disadvantages to the local residents. Because of these reasons, I believe this scheme, and ones like it, should be more widespread. Another suggestion that Chester City Council may have encountered is Computerised Traffic Lights. I don't think these would have a great effect; if anything, I think the sets of traffic lights already in place in Chester, especially on the round a bouts, do more harm than good. They probably aren't expensive but if it was up to me, I would not use these in Chester. Overall, in my opinion, I think that if Chester City Council and it's residents want Chester to become less congested, traffic-wise, the Council needs to spend a lot of money implementing solutions such as widening roads and building a new lane specially for buses, building cycle routes and car parks and generally making more space for the ever-growing amount of cars on Britain's roads. All the solutions supplied have their own drawbacks but I feel that, in my opinion I have separated the good solutions from the bad ones. My information was based on my own knowledge, my parents' knowledge (who travel to Chester regularly in different types of transport) and the worksheet: 'Problem's in Developed Cities.' Paul Dunn Chester's Traffic Congestion 10BT 27/04/07 1 23:50 ...read more.

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