• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Medieval warm period and Little Ice Age

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Medieval warm period and Little Ice Age Solar Output During the period 1645-1715, in the middle of the Little Ice Age, there was a period of low solar activity known as the Maunder Minimum. There is a still very poor understanding of the correlation between low sunspot activity and cooling temperatures. Volcanic Activity Throughout the Little Ice Age, the world also experienced heightened volcanic activity. When a volcano erupts, its ash reaches high into the atmosphere and can spread to cover the whole Earth. ...read more.

Middle

The 1815 eruption of Tambour in Indonesia blanketed the atmosphere with ash; the following year, 1816, came to be known as the year without summer, when frost and snow were reported in June and July in both New England and Northern Europe. Other volcanoes that erupted during the era and may have contributed to the cooling include Billy Mitchell (1580 ), Mount Parker (1641), Long Island (Papua New Guinea) (ca. 1660), and I also think the volcano that has recently erupted the Iceland had a big impact in Europe. ...read more.

Conclusion

Between 1607 and 1814, the English regularly held a frost fair on the frozen river Thames. There would be puppet shows, races, and sledding. The Frost Fair did not happen every year, but the River Thames did freeze over at least 24 times in the London area during the Little Ice Age. Life during the Little Ice Age was difficult. The cold weather shortened the growing season, and assisted in the growth of molds and fungi that destroyed crops. The cold winters would sometimes cause livestock to die. Wild animals also suffered from the weather. Peasants worked hard on the land, and could barely eke out a living. Crops sometimes failed entirely, and famine would result. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Physical Geography section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Physical Geography essays

  1. The Long Term Effects of Volcanic Eruptions

    This can prove to be a health hazard. Since ashfall cannot be prevented, the public has to take precautionary measures. For instance, during that period when the air is still heavily polluted, people living in the vicinity can wear protective clothing and high-efficiency dust masks to prevent inhalation of dust particles.

  2. Free essay

    Notes on Solar power.

    Every 5 years an independent consulting engineer, approved by the Commission, must inspect and evaluate projects with dams higher than 32.8 feet (10 meters), or with a total storage capacity of more than 2,000 acre-feet (2.5 million cubic meters). Environmentally Friendly - The major negative effects of hydroelectric power are environmental (destruction of habitats)

  1. Physical Case Studies AQA Revision notes - Ice, rivers and volcanoes.

    loudhailer, sirens, charities like the Red Cross set up temporary schools, the UK government sent emergency aid, some people evacuated on boats, charities sent emergency food for animals, people evacuated to the north of the island, troops from USA sent to help evacuation * LONG TERM RESPONSES: The south of

  2. The structure of the Earth and the impact of volcanic eruptions.

    Water was supplied in tankers, aid agencies including Christian Aid and Oxfam were involved in distributing medicine, food and blankets. Mt. St Helens, USA: When- 18th May 1980 Where- Cascade Range in the Washington state. Why- The Juan de fuca plate subducted under the North American plate which caused friction causing an earthquake of 5.1 Richter to follow.

  1. Taal Volcano

    flows, ballistic fallout, ash and scoria fallout, toxic gases, acidic flashes from crater lake, lake tsunamis and seiches, lakeshore flooding, earthquakes, ground fissuring and subsidence, landslides and sectoral collapse, turbulent ashflows, and lahars. These are most of the volcanic hazards recorded from Taal and volcanic cones near it.

  2. Farming and Famine

    What really worries me is the lack of patience, and more so the power of the companies behind GM crops, that could easily see the crops on the market with their money and supremacy over the rest of the industry.

  1. Physical Geography Earth revision notes

    You always get the warm front first . Blue lines with triangles ? cold front Red lines with semicircles ? warm front Responses to global warming Two types of response to climate change * Adaptation ? planning to reduce the damaging effects of global warming * Mitigation ? trying to slow down global warming by controlling greenhouse gases .

  2. Earthquakes and volcanoes research

    Keep away from over head electric wires and bridges. After an earthquake 1. Check yourself and nearby people for injuries and provide first aid if possible. 2. Check electric and gas connections if they?re still on because in the future it can cause other disasters such as fires.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work