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The Spanish Tourism Industry

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Introduction

The Spanish Tourism Industry Spain has long been the European centre for package tourism. Miles of beautiful sandy beaches along with crystal clear waters of the Mediterranean attracted tourists from the 1950's onwards. Little fishing villages have grown to be massive concrete disasters filled to the brim with linear 1970's hotels along the sea. This steady progression from idyllic white walls with clay roofs to cabaret evenings and Tourist "tack" has taken 56 years but has it finally reached it pinnacle? The Spanish tourist industry is worth over 6 billion pounds, 6 billion of this comes from the United Kingdom each year. Spain was until the 1950's a mainly agricultural country relying on exports such as cloths, fruits and fish. The area known as Andalusia or more commonly the Costa del Sol is the heart of Spain's tourist industry. ...read more.

Middle

The problem is now that new planes have become cheaper and have evolved into a new style of airline. The low cost airline. With these low cost airlines people can afford to travel to more exotic and less areas with lower tourists and for longer periods. Areas such as the United States of America and Asia have become more common as holiday prices. Large resorts in Florida such as Disney land pull in millions of visitors a year. Even the new style tourists who self book flights and accommodation can be found to go to inland areas of Spain away from the sprawling masses. These new tourists stay away from large built up spaces and tend to go in search of culture of which Spain has destroyed a lot of in previous searches to gain tourists. ...read more.

Conclusion

1,340,000 people are employed by the Spanish tourist industry; unfortunately lots of these jobs are filled by migrants from abroad by young people in search of summer jobs. The fact is more people now arrive in the Spanish airports looking to buy houses or invest in timeshares than actually want to stay in a resort. This will be the start of a slow demise for the costal tourist industry in Spain. Spain's hopeful saviour will be green tourism; this is the new breed of tourists that come to visits sites such as the Alhambra palace or Spain's magnificent caves. Along with new interests such as cycling, walking or canoeing holidays that pull in the younger age groups looking for a healthier holiday. In conclusion for Spain to revive its tourist industry it will have to clean the heavily polluted waters of the Mediterranean and shake of this image of a holiday place for club 18-30. This is what is deterring the masses of families and middle aged tourists. ...read more.

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