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To what extent does the nature of pedestrianised and non-pedestrianised areas differ in Burnley's C.B.D.?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

TO WHAT EXTENT DOES THE NATURE OF PEDESTRIANISED AND NON-PEDESTRIANISED AREAS DIFFER IN BURNLEY'S C.B.D.? INTRODUCTION Burnley is a borough town in the county of Lancashire, northern England. It is situated north of Manchester, at the junction of the Rivers Burn and Calder. It is easily accessible from all parts of the country. It has an area of 52 sq mi (134 sq km). In common with other towns of Lancashire, Burnley grew rapidly from the end of the 18th century with the development of the cotton textile industry. The building of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal and the presence of coal were factors helping its development. By the early 19th century cotton weaving was the dominant industry. Today the economy of the district has diversified, and light engineering is now important. The central area has been re-developed. Townley Hall, mainly 17th century, is the borough's art gallery and museum and is set in parkland. Population of town is estimated at 90,600. There are a superb variety of stores in an attractive shopping environment. The glass covered walkways and atriums in Charter Walk Shopping Centre contain some of the biggest high street names. The traditional Victorian streets are crammed with fascinating specialist shops and traditional markets with over 260 stalls for all tastes and ages. The attractive landscaped environment of Curzon Square shopping area, with nearby car parking, enhances current shopping facilities. Burnley Town Centre offers great places to eat and drink. Choose from over 25 venues. Burnley has a wide range of quality leisure facilities all within walking distance of the town centre including; Multi-Screen Cinema, Leisure Centre, Ten-Pin Bowling Alley, Art Gallery, Modern Bingo Hall, Division 1 Professional Football Club, and numerous other attractions. Throughout the year there is town centre entertainment including Shopping Festivals and Christmas Entertainment. Exciting new developments are planned for the future, which will continue to improve the town centre area and will ensure that Burnley is the place to be...for Shopping, Leisure and Business. ...read more.

Middle

This is the first thing that attracts the customer's attention. People will see this is a shop with high quality goods. - If the quality is kept at a high standard, people will continue to shop here in Burnley. - Burnley is fighting tough competition from other towns and cities, so the way to attract customers is visually. This is successful but mainly near the centre of the C.B.D. But the further from the C.B.D., the quality seems to decrease (shop quality), which is shown on the map. But this cannot be said in all areas (for shopping quality). - If the shopping quality were improved in the other areas, the whole of the C.B.D. would be appealing and would be used completely. This will benefit Burnley and will be a threat to other towns and cities. CONCLUSION Mann Whitney U test - tests whether two sets of data are different. A null hypothesis has been set up: there is no significant difference between...pedestrianised and non pedestrianised areas in terms of: 1) Pedestrian flow 2) Environmental quality 3) Shopping quality Key questions: 1) Which areas of Burnley's C.B.D. are pedestrianised? The areas that were pedestrianised (6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 21, 23, 24, 25, 27, 28 and 30) were areas busy with pedestrians and also traffic e.g. drivers and public transport etc. These areas were also in the centre or very close to the centre of the C.B.D. 2) How does land use vary between pedestrianised and non-pedestrianised areas? The land use map (Fig 10) shows that areas that were pedestrianised were areas that had major shopping units and clothes and shoe shops, which are popular areas to shop. This is visually distinct in the northern area of the C.B.D. The southern area being mainly clusters of professional services and catering/entertainment. These areas are not always busy as they are only visited at certain times of day. ...read more.

Conclusion

If a pedestrian count was done at different times of day, it may provide information as to why areas are pedestrianised or non-pedestrianised. It could also provide information of when pedestrian density changes during the day. E.g. food shops may be busier at lunchtime or in the evenings. If the issue of judging environment and shop quality were improved, then this would increase reliability of end results. E.g. by narrowing the range of scoring from 0-3 points. Possibly doing more points on the map will also increase accuracy of results. If a questionnaire was done, then questions could be answered from the pedestrians themselves. Questions like people's personal opinions on pedestrianisation from shoppers and also drivers, and then improvements to Burnley could be made, without having doubts on the opinions of the public, local and non-local. Other questions can be asked to improve on this particular investigation such as how the shoppers travelled to Burnley, or whether they even came to shop or not. A lot of pedestrians could have come because they worked in the C.B.D. This would definitely change results. Also if questions are asked as to where the shoppers were from. If the majority were actually living in Burnley, then improvements would need to be made to attract people from outside Burnley. Other surveys such as traffic flow surveys could be done and then it can be observed whether traffic flow and other factors surrounding traffic are linked to pedestrianisation or not. This may suggest why pedestrians are attracted or not attracted to that area and that it could be due to traffic factors rather than environment or shopping factors. An interview with the town centre manager would also be helpful to see what new proposals they have to improve Burnley as a town, in the future. Overall, the main patterns and trends have been found with some fairly good, evident reasons in to the nature of pedestrian activity, but with these extensions, the results could be enhanced, with more in depth conclusions. ...read more.

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