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Tourism does more harm than good in The Isle of Purbeck. Tourism should not be promoted or encouraged.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

HYPOTHESIS: Tourism does more harm than good in The Isle of Purbeck Of Purbeck. Tourism should not be promoted or encouraged. WHERE IS IT? . The number of people recorded in 10 minutes Old Harry Rocks- Studland Bay- Blue Pool- I think that the 3 sites have different sort of thing to offer for the tourists. Each site may hold a value for different types of tourists, for example a family may go to Studland Bay to enjoy the sun, but other tourists such as geologists may go there to study land formation. I believe more people go to Studland Bay because of the beautiful beaches; many families go there as well as other tourists. Blue pool is a beautiful, quiet, tranquil place. Families with small toddlers are less likely to go there because it does not suit the small children. ...read more.

Middle

This cannot be helped because to learn from these natural sites we are going to have to interfere. By looking at the negative effects I feel that Tourism does more harm than good in The Isle of Purbeck. Tourism should not be promoted or encouraged. After studying each site in great detail and referring to my hypothesis I believe that tourism should not be encouraged. If the Isle of Purbeck came up with a way that people could view and study the landforms without damaging them or interfering with them, then I believe tourism should be encouraged. By having a sustainable development programme people can learn and not damage anything by doing that. For my development plan I chose Old Harry Rocks because I thought this is the most dangerous and interesting site. I felt that I could help make Old Harry Rocks a safer place then it is now. ...read more.

Conclusion

While tourists are walking around they can look at the information board and understand why the Old Harry Rocks look like what they are. > A signpost to say that there is a large sheer cliff. This is there just to warn the tourists, so they don't get too close to the edge. > Put benches where people can safely sit and rest. If anyone needs to sit down and relax to get their breath back, there would be many benches to sit on. Again the benches are made of wood so they don't ruin the landform. > Put litter bins where more people stand. This will help prevent litter being thrown on the ground. Old Harry Rocks would be a lot cleaner. > A small hut which provides refreshments, which has a couple of more bins near it. If people want a bottle of water they can purchase it from the hut. This does increase the chance of litter, but there will be plenty of bins provided to dispose of the litter. By Veenesh Halai 1 ...read more.

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