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Tourism In Kenya.

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Introduction

Tourism In Kenya Kenya is a popular place for people to go on holiday. Tourism is Kenya's fastest growing industry and largest earner of money from overseas. People go to Kenya for many reasons. Most have seen television programmes on it and want to experience animals in their natural habitats, not in zoos. For many it is a danger, ambition, dreams and opportunity. There was also a big boost of tourism after the release of the film "Out of Africa". Tourists can see the animals from hot air balloon and Kenya has some of the world's biggest balloons. Tourists come on foreign exchanges and holidays; they come to see some Maasai villages and the Maasai Mara National Park. ...read more.

Middle

Many of the minibus drivers in National Parks drive too close to the animals to get extra tips and please their customers. The hot air balloons that are constantly flying over the Parks disturb the animals and birds with their noise and huge passing shadows. They have set whole herds of animals on the move, like the rhino, who have been driven out by the noise. The trailers for the balloons tear up the ground making the grass turn to dust. Some say the Maasai Mara is being turned into a funfair and that there is no peace for the animals anymore. ...read more.

Conclusion

Tourists don't cover up, they wear revealing clothing and swimsuits and this is having an effect on the local women who envy this dress code. Local tribes complain that tourists bring prostitution, drink and drugs to their villages, and their women are being led astray. There have been attempts made to try to blend tourism in with the environment. Minibuses are only allowed up to 25metres from the animals and are not allowed off the roads. North of Mombassa, in a town called Lamu, there are no large hotels, few bars selling alcohol and no package holidays or tours. Tourists are discouraged from wearing revealing clothing and charged to go into the main town and Sauo National Park. If this were to happen all over Kenya then the effects of tourism might not be as bad. Jack Layden 09/05/2007 1 ...read more.

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