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What are the consequences of deforestation?

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Introduction

CONSEQUENCES OF DEFORESTATION IN THE AMAZON What are the consequences of deforestation? * Mining on the scale seen in the Amazon will destroy and pollute vast areas of the natural environment. For example, the Carajas iron - project could create a mining complex the size of the UK and France combined. * Soil fertility will decrease and erosion increase. This will increase flooding and make farming difficult. * Some species of hardwood trees will become endangered. * The burning of rainforests will release more carbon into the atmosphere and contribute to global warming. * One half of the world's oxygen comes from the Amazon Basin. Less trees means less oxygen and more pollution. * The Amazon Basin could become a desert as fewer trees will drastically reduce the amount of water vapour entering the atmosphere. ...read more.

Middle

However, with the clearance of the forest, there is a loss of a protective cover for the soil. With deforestation, there will be a higher rate surface run off and these results in a higher rate of soil erosion and soil leaching. In soil erosion, the top soil is being removed or washed away by the higher surface run off. Soil leaching is a process by which nutrients are washed deeper into the soil and causes the top soil to become increasingly infertile over time. This, through soil erosion and soil leaching, the soil in the deforested area gradually loses its fertility. ; The nutrient cycle. INCREASE IN WATER POLLUTION AND FLOODING When the soil on cleared land begins to erode, more soil is washed into the rivers. ...read more.

Conclusion

An example of a valuable plant species in the Amazon rainforest which faces extinction is the Cinchona tree, from which quinine is extracted for the treatment of malaria. Many animals die when he tropical rainforest is felled and burnt. Many others die because their natural habitat in the tropical rainforest has been destroyed. Over time, some animal species may become extinct. DESTRUCTION OF HABITAT AND CULTURE OF THE AMAZONIAN INDIANS The indigenous people of the Amazon Basin are the American Indians who are hunters and gatherers while others are shifting cultivators. They rely on the forest for their food, shelter and clothing. The extensive clearance of the tropical rainforest in the Amazon Basin has resulted in the destruction of their habitat and their traditional way of life or culture. When the tropical rainforest is cleared, they are forced to move out of the forest and many find it difficult to adapt to life outside the rainforest. ...read more.

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