• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why did so many people die in the 2010 Haiti earthquake?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐On the 12th January 2010, a tragic 7.0 magnitude quake on the Richter scale struck near Port au Prince in Haiti. This devastating earthquake was caused by a conservative plate boundary which had not caused an earthquake for 200years. 3,500,000 people were affected by the quake, 220,000 were estimated to have died, and over 300,000 people were injured. Over 188,383 houses were badly damaged 105,000 were destroyed by the earthquake (293,383 in total) and 1.5m people became homeless. After the quake there were 19 million cubic metres of rubble and debris in Port au Prince which was enough to fill a line of shipping containers stretching end to end from London to Beirut (The capital of Lebanon). Furthermore, 4,000 schools were damaged or destroyed and 60% of Government and administrative buildings, 80% of schools in Port-au-Prince and 60% of schools in the South and West Departments were destroyed or damaged. The impact of this was one of the most devastating anyone had ever witnessed. However, why did San Francisco earthquake (Loma Prieta) in 1980 which was magnitude of 6.9 in the Richter scale only cause 69 deaths compared to the death toll of 220,000 in Haiti? ...read more.

Middle

Most houses were self-built- they were out of breeze blocks and scrap, with no foundations or rules restricting height. Many houses were built on steep hillsides. The consequences of this were disastrous. It caused pancaking from buildings, which is when the pillars of a building give away and the roof collapses on top of the floor. As a result of this the earthquake demolished 50% of Port-au-Prince?s buildings. This also crushed or trapped people inside the buildings and killed the majority of people. In addition, Haiti had no rescue service to save some people who required medical help immediately after the quake since it had financial difficulties. The buildings were death traps in Haiti. However in 1913 the U.S.A. introduced life-safe buildings which were designed to save lives during an earthquake. Some of the regulations were that buildings required special emergency doors, which have designed dimensions and special features such as the safety glazing identification requirements for the glass in the building. They also have strong foundations and reinforced pillars to prevent collapsing in an earthquake. An example of a life-safe building is the Transamerica Pyramid. ...read more.

Conclusion

Geologists like Prof. Paul Mann and Dr. Carol Prentice actually predicted this earthquake but the government totally ignored these warnings. This is very sad because Geologists are predicting an earthquake in Haiti again and the government are not preparing or causing any kind of awareness by building buildings with reinforced joints and stronger pillars, which is something very straightforward, and can save thousands of lives. All of the above factors have caused a huge number of life losses in Haiti but the root of the cause is the corruption of the government. The reason why there were so many deaths was the fact that Haiti was not prepared, unlike the U.S.A. and other MEDC?s like Japan, which both suffer frequently from earthquakes. If the government were not corrupt and could rise up and resolve the financial problems in Haiti, there would have been many less casualties as they would have the money to help prepare for an earthquake. All countries who suffer from earthquakes should see Haiti as a lesson to learn from to prevent something like this to happen again. Houses built on marginal land UN troops patrolling the streets. Haiti after the quake The Transamerica pyramid Page ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Human Geography section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

5 star(s)

An excellent review of the main physical and human factors affecting the impacts of the Haiti earthquake. Very good use of geographical terminology and statistics. Some useful named examples as evidence of points made. To further improve: give sources of data/photos/specific info AND also state the physical data of the USA earthquake too.

Marked by teacher Katie Price 29/03/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Human Geography essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Discuss the negative impacts of Urbanisation

    5 star(s)

    Air pollution is one of the major problems of urbanization. The air quality between rural areas and the urban areas is significant. Factories and automobiles are part and parcel of urbanization. Harmful emission of gases and smoke from factories and vehicles causes air pollution.

  2. Peer reviewed

    How can urban living be sustainable

    4 star(s)

    On the other hand this makes it extremely crowded even though they are 1,100 buses which make around 12,000 trips a day. The facilities are very good with bus stops designed to create the most efficient on boarding and offloading.

  1. What impact has tourism had on the people and the environment of Jamaica?

    According to the JTB (Jamaican Tourist Board), the number of people in employment has dramatically increased from 9527 to 13619 between 1980 and 1985, and even now it has grown substantially as more tourists visit this place. Moreover, tourism provides 11.8 percent of GDP (Gross Domestic Product)

  2. GCSE Geography Settlement Coursework

    This means that it will have fewer staff to the other Costa in Oxford. The Costa in Summertown is very popular because it is unique to the other shops in Summertown, whilst there are many different cafes in Oxford. It should attract less people than the Costa in the Claredon

  1. Human Geography Revision Notes - population patterns and changes.

    which have led to longer lives and a decrease in infant mortality * Improvements in sanitation and water supply * The quality and quantity of food produced improves * Transport and communications improve the moments of food and medical supplies Stage 3: Developing LICs, e.g.

  2. Discuss the problems of the Central Business Districts of MEDC cities. Suggest solutions to ...

    but on the motorway there are no traffic lights and you can travel much faster so you take less time then you would if you travel through the CBD. An example of a ring-road is the M 25 going around London.

  1. To create three different hypotheses related to tourism and tourists in Dubai that can ...

    This is because jobs come with a holiday entitlement which is paid for. In the 1950's, the average number of working hours was 50 hours; this is illustrated in figure 11 If we divide this by five which is the number of days people work in a week we get 10.

  2. Does the Bentalls Shopping Centre in Kingston Upon Thames meet the needs of the ...

    In my opinion the variety of shops stretching from Stationary shops to Clothes shops in Bentalls is brilliant and it also has chain stores. I think it is important for a shopping mall to have chain stores because the quality of the item purchased is normally good and cheap.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work