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Aim: I am going to asses Rubys physical and emotional development by doing a toy discrimination test.

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Introduction

Visit 2 Date: 14th September Time: 4:45pm Duration: 30 minutes Age of child: 1 year 2 months Where: Ruby's house Who present: Me, Deborah and Ruby Aim: I am going to asses Ruby's physical and emotional development by doing a toy discrimination test. Expectations Physical Development: I expect to see a mixture of both fine and gross motor skills in the activity. As her age I expect Ruby to have a more developed and precise pincer grip as Mary D Sheridan says that by 15 months she should be able to " pick up string or small objects with a precise pincer grasp using either hand". Even though she's not 15 months she is close to 15 months and should be well on the way to achieving what a 15 month old should. Other fine motor skills she should be able to do is "build a tower of two bricks or more after demonstration and hold and drink from a cup with the aid of an adult". This is according to Mary D Sheridan. At 15 months Ruby "may walk alone, usually with uneven steps and feet wide apart, arms slightly flexed". Due to her age being only 14 months she still may fall down or need to be steadied by an adult first. Ruby may "creep upstairs safely" so if she uses her slide etc she may be able to go up the steps unaided. ...read more.

Middle

Ruby pointed at me and tried to say my name. It wasn't very clear but you could tell she was trying to say my name. Deborah said hi and offered to get me a drink whilst I showed her and explained the toy discrimination test to her. Whilst Deborah was making herself a coffee and getting Ruby and me a cold drink I sat Ruby on the floor and placed the objects of the toy test in front of her. I explained briefly to her in easy language what I was going to ask her to do. She didn't make any sign of understanding what I said and looked up at me shyly. She asked me what something was so I pointed to each object and told her what they where and asked her to repeat them. She couldn't pronounce all the words but she made a good attempt. For some words she replaced them with other words for example duck was replaced with "quack quack". Deborah came into the room to give me a drink and left to answer the telephone. As Deborah left Ruby got up and followed her. I called to Ruby to come back which she didn't but when Deborah told her to go back she did. I started the test by asking her to give me the cow which she did and the duck which she did. ...read more.

Conclusion

I saw her use the pincer and tripod grasp which I've seen at every visit and she should of learnt to do those grasps at the age of 9 months according to Pamela Minett. Intellectual Development: For several of the instructions I gave (eg. Give me the duck, put the cow on the plate) Ruby did what I had asked her to do which is normal and as I expected as quoted by Mary D Sheridan to "point to familiar persons, animals or toys when requested." I was surprised to see that Ruby knew what the some of the words where as Dr. B. Mc McCormick (inventor of the toy discrimination test) stated at 18 months the words that most average 18 month old children would get wrong (see expectations). I repeated the instructions several times and she got them right. Therefore, according to Dr. B McCormick Ruby has a vocabulary above what is expected of her age. Emotional Development: Ruby wasn't as shy with my as I expected. According to Mary D Sheridan at 15 months should be "emotionally labile and closely dependent upon adult's reassuring presence" so because Ruby was there for most of the visit it could of because she wasn't worried about me whilst her mum was there. Social Development: Ruby wasn't shy towards me as expected (see emotional development) she became bored and uncooperative after 15 minutes. This is normal for the age of the child according to Mary D Sheridan as she said in her book they become "physically restless" very quickly. ...read more.

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