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An introduction to working with children,

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Introduction

´╗┐Hannah WrightUnit 1Task 1 An introduction to working with children. D1: Describe the purpose of 1 setting that is statutory provision for children aged three-five and five-seven years (5 Marks). An example of a care setting for children aged three-five years old is an infant school. This is within the statutory care setting. At an infant school the children would learn new things through play and also socialise with others to make new friends. In infant school, children are introduced to education in fun, new ways to help them learn. Children will start to follow the early years foundation stage and the national curriculum. An example of a care setting for children aged three-five years old is an infant school. This is within the statutory care setting, which means that it has to be there by law. At an infant school the children would begin to follow the early years foundation stage and the national curriculum, whilst also learning new things through play and also socialise with others to make new friends. In infant school, children are introduced to education in fun, exciting new ways to help them learn. An example of a statutory care setting for children aged five-seven years old is an optician. An optician is there to check children?s eye sight, this shows if there are any problems with the eyes and shows whether or not the specific child is in need of eye care. For example glasses or contact lenses. At the opticians they also provide hearing tests, but if any problems are discovered with a child?s hearing then they are referred to a hospital as they cannot personally deal with this problem. D2: Describe the purpose of 1 setting that is a different type of provision for children aged three-five and five-seven years. (Voluntary, Independent and Private). (5 Marks). An example of another care setting for a child aged three-five is a toy library. ...read more.

Middle

curriculum just with a bit of help or slightly different help so that they are able to achieve all of the work that has been set. Diversity means difference. Diversity is an understanding that everyone is different and unique and not excluding them because of their differences. Diversity is very important as you need to understand the difference of every child. Every child is unique and different in their own way; no child should be bullied or not involved in things because of their differences. Also inclusive practice is important as no child should be left alone because of a disability or difference that they may have compared to another child. People that have special needs such as being in a wheel chair or not being able to move properly should still be included in sport, or people with learning difficulties should still be able to do the same curriculum, just with a bit of help or slightly different help so that they are able to achieve all of the work that has been set. Children should not be discriminated by the colour of their hair or skin colour. Every child is equal no matter how they look or act, (inclusive practise). D8: Bibliography/sources of information (5 Marks). 1.Miss Moriss, subject teacher. 2. Mrs Fothergill, subject teacher. 3. Mrs Coston, skills coach. 4. Mrs Bull, cover supervisor. 5. Textbook: CACHE L2 Childcare and education 3rd edition. Penny Tassoni, Heinemann,2007. 6. www.wikipedia.org/ B1: Explain why first impressions are important (9-10 Marks). First impressions are so important so that a person knows if you are right for a job or not, If the children will like you and if you?re organised and punctual enough. They will also check to see if you are dressed appropriately, e.g. no jewellery, short skirts or low cut tops. Also your communication skills and the way you act at the interview will have a big effect on your first impression. ...read more.

Conclusion

This would make the child feel more embarrassed or conscious about the situation. Also if the information was that important, for example the child was at significant risk of harm then they would need to keep this information confidential and only share it with the appropriate people. This includes any managers, deputy managers and supervisors of the care setting. If this is not kept confidential then someone is then able to abuse the information and harm the child. The importance of keeping information about children and families confidential is to ensure that no important documents/information is able to get in the wrong hands. This is because if any important personal information gets in the wrong hands then the information can be abused or used against them, this then means that the family can be targeted with rumours, violence, harassment, put in danger and also any situations at hand could get worse. The relationship between staff and child or family may become weaker. This would mean that there is no trust between a family and the staff of a setting. This may then lead to the child feeling isolated and feeling like they cannot trust anyone. This could have a big effect on the staff or setting as there would be no trust. Also, if a child has any medical problems or allergies that they are embarrassed about then they wouldn?t particularly want anybody knowing about them, just in case the child gets bullied, taken the mick out of or has been previously bullied in the past because of it. This would make a child feel more embarrassed or self-conscious about the situation. Also, if any information was very important, for example the child was at significant risk of harm then they would need to keep this information confidential and only share it with the appropriate members of staff. This includes any managers, deputy managers or supervisors of the setting. If this information is not kept confidential then someone is able to then abuse the information and put the child at significant risk. ...read more.

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