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Cach L2 unit 4. Childrens Play

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Introduction

CACHE Unit 4 Children?s Play ________________ D1. Identify 3 different settings where children might play: 1. Home 2. Adventure Park 3. Pre- school setting D2. State the typical age range and the stage of play of the children who might play in the setting: Home would be for 0-16 years because they would be there a lot of the time and would have to play to develop there skills. This is co-operative play which is children work together to gain something in the end. Adventure Park setting would be for 4+ years because something?s could be too challenging for a very young child and they could hurt themselves. This is associate play were children play and start to interact with other children and develop much needed skills. Pre- school setting would be for 3-5 years because that would be the age range for children in pre ? school setting. This is parallel play the children will play along side other children but not interact with them. D3. Describe 1 type of play that may take place in each setting: In the Home setting, children will do pretend play, they could play superhero play were they pretend they are Superman or Spiderman; because they have all their toys and different objects around them so they can talk with the toys and this develops their language and communication skills. In the Adventure Park, they will do physical play, they could play TAG and run around a lot; when they run around and climb up and over things. They would gain strength, stamina, fitness and co-ordination. They also learn social skills when talking to other children. In a Pre-school setting, children will play domestic play. This is they act out what they have seen their parents do e.g. Ironing or cooking; They will act out ironing, cooking and anything they see their parents do. They would gain social skills and communication. ...read more.

Middle

Taking risks can have a positive benefit in terms of the children?s development, social and emotional needs. 1. Children learn vital skills needed for adulthood a d gain experience needed to face the unpredictable nature of the world. 2. However, if children are deprived of risk play, this can result in a huge lack of experience to carry out tasks effectively leading to inability to cope in stressful situations and as a result, leading to poor social skills. 3. Risk play contributes to creativity in a child. Children will develop a sense of balance if equipment set is high. B2: Explain how the adult can encourage exploration and investigation through play: What is structed play? 1. Structed play activities are planned and led by an adult. 2. The idea of structed activities is that children are able to learn while exploring and playing. 3. Structed activities help children to use materials and explore concepts that they might not otherwise do. Children may practice different skills e.g. counting pretend money. Adult- directed activities 1. It is where the adult is leading the activity or play and children gain experience and skills by following instructions from the adult. 2. It is important that the activities are interesting and ??right for every child?s development level? (Tassoni, p. 176, 2007). 3. They do this to find out what stage of learning the child is at. Adult- initiated activities 1. These are play and activities that have been planned by adults but not led by them. 2. Adults- initiated activities where adults provide the materials and equipment so that children can learn from using them. 3. For example putting out dough with scissors is likely to encourage children to cut the dough and so develop their cutting skills through play. Child- initiated activities 1. These are play and activities that children organise for them. These types of play are sometimes called free play. ...read more.

Conclusion

1. When we set out a play area we need to see if all the children can access the area and play without difficultly. When we become involved with play we can?t tell the child what to do, we have to let them make their own choices. When we ask questions we have to ask the children what level they are at and create an activity around their own personal needs to push them forward in their personal development. Play is important because it helps children to develop personal skills; ??play is important?? (Jean Piaget). Relating Piaget theory to play to types of play: 1. In physical play, Piaget?s theory states that each stage is built on the knowledge and experience of the one before and it was throughout play that children gained an understanding of their world (Tassoni P.153, 2007) For example, at first a child of 2 years attempts to ride a tricycle and gains experience, later when he/she turns 3 years, he/she uses that experience and will start riding a bike. Piaget felt that children would need to have experience of different materials, equipment and activities so that they could form their own ideas. Piaget?s theory of play and how it is related to creative play. 1. Age 2-7 years 2. Stage ? pre-operational stage ? this stage helps children to develop learning process. 3. Type of play ? creative play A child will be able to pretend things and mimic different actions, he or she will be putting the first small steps forward to using various symbols as a learning process. The cognitive benefit for the child using creative play e.g. using paint and drawing, putting marks on paper will help him or her to learn about communication. Creative play also encourages language opportunities for the children to develop including fine physical skills e.g. using properties of materials through cooperative play. 1. Children need to have play with others and by themselves to develop all kind of skills; e.g. social skills, communication skills, vital skills for later life and language skills. Cache Unit 4 ...read more.

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