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"Children are entitled to be provided with an appropriate curriculum" - discuss.

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Introduction

"Children are entitled to be provided with an appropriate curriculum" Curricula are courses of study. To be effective they need to be appropriate for the children they are targeted at. This means specifying what and how the children are to be taught. The children have an entitlement to be educated using appropriate curricula, not only on ethical grounds but also by legislation and recommendations both nationally and locally. The foundation stage curriculum begins when a child reaches the age of three and finishes at the end of the reception year. It must provide an effective learning environment, particularly for those children who need support. It requires careful structuring with adults playing a crucial role in the organisation. Communication with adults and activities that stimulate the child's mind lay a foundation for the child's development in oral language, literacy and numeracy. A rights and legislation approach means that children are entitled to freedom of association, provided it does not deny their entitlement to protection from hostile influences. This allows them to interact in different relationships safely. Effective education requires practitioners who are able to supply the curriculum requirements. Children are entitled to provisions that support their knowledge, understanding, skills and confidence. The right to play in a stimulating environment is part of the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Child. ...read more.

Middle

Another example is the child should not get too much maths at the expense of language. By observing the range of activities in which the child engages, people become aware of the breadth, balance and the strengths and weaknesses of a group's provision. Lady Plowden (1967) produced a report titled 'Children And Their Primary Schools'. It advocates that play is the main activity in all nursery and many infant schools. The report states "Adults who criticise teachers for allowing children to play are unaware that play is the principle means of learning in early childhood." It believes there should be no distinction between work and play. If children become fully absorbed in play they are learning to concentrate, consequently developing new skills. The report believes that by using materials to construct and destroy things, children gain a sense of height and weight. Emotional and moral development was included. "When teachers enter into the play activity of children, they can help by watching the connections and relationships which children are making and by introducing, almost incidentally, the words for the concepts and feelings that are being expressed." http://www.newman.ac.uk/c.v.squires/plough.html. Plowden's recommendations have been supported by other's, e.g. Curtis said play is a major part of a child's education. (Curtis, A. ...read more.

Conclusion

The British Association of Teachers of the Deaf (BATOD) Good co-operation is essential between teachers and speech therapists to ensure that therapy compliments the learning. This assumes that all teachers and speech and language therapists hold additional qualifications. Guidelines prepared by the BATOD improve working relationships between teachers and speech and language therapists. They should include familiarity with the structure of the Local Education Service for hearing-impaired children. E.g. heads of school for hearing impaired children take responsibility for co-ordinating peripatetic services. http://www.batod.org.uk/speechandlang_nf.htm. For the future The Foundation Stage Profile is a statutory assessment for children who reach the end of the foundation stage. It has replaced the Statutory Baseline from September 2002 and the first profiles will be completed by summer 2003. http://edunet.iow.gov.uk/curriculum/early_years/Foundation_Curriculum/ "Appropriate support should be building upon what the child already knows and putting knowledge across in a way that will motivate the child to aid future development', as they are ready to move beyond the Foundation Stage". (Pollard, A. 1996). In conclusion, children are required to be provided with an appropriate curriculum as a base for their learning and to avoid difficulties later in life. In support of the Children's Act (1989) I believe that this can only be achieved through both supportive guidance and co-operation through teachers between support staff and other agencies, not merely as a legislative right. Several groups need to be involved. All the involved groups need to involve parents to make education of the young child completely inclusive. ...read more.

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