• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Children's problems are most fruitfully seen as social constructions, that is, located in social relationships and arising from how other people in the child's life view the child's behaviour'. Discuss

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Mrs Tracey Goode: T6164966. Children's problems are most fruitfully seen as social constructions, that is, located in social relationships and arising from how other people in the child's life view the child's behaviour'. Discuss this statement, with particular reference to the problem of developing a clinical formulation. When a child is behaving differently from what is regarded as the 'norm' a parent, teacher or social worker, which feels it is beyond their control, will seek professional help. These judgements can be subjective and ambiguous. The judgements that we make are placed against social strands and will vary depending on individual characteristics e.g. morals and expectations, families and different cultures. What one person may regard as deviating from the 'norm' another may not. This essay is going to illustrate the problems of understanding child's behaviour by looking at how different psychological perspectives perceive social influence on children's behaviour, the controversy surrounding how people perceive children's behaviour and therefore why it is hard to develop a clinical formulation. As a society whether it be parents, teachers or friends, we generally pick up on when children have problems due to their behaviour deviating from the norm. ...read more.

Middle

There are different rules, rituals and regulations. c) Those making judgements may vary in their expectations of children's behaviour, there tolerance of difficulties and the effectiveness of their approach to maintaining discipline. Each of the above is actors, which will modify the expression and identification of what is regarded as problems within the child. 'Difficulties arise when the behaviour and goals of the child lack 'goodness of fit' with the social environment to which the child is expected to adapt (Chess and Thomas, 1984) Apart from the issue of determining why the child is behaving out of the 'norm', psychologists also have the problems of arriving at a clinical formulation. These problems include developing a good therapeutic relationship, standardising assessment and diagnosis. Whether a child's behaviour is identified, as a problem becomes a judgement about where to draw the line between normality and abnormality, health and pathology, integration and disturbance. A clinical psychologist will attempt to see things from the child's point of view, which is difficult, as the child has usually attained characteristic behaviours of being distrustful, morose and uncommunicative. They must also be sympathetic to the child's needs as well as empathetic in order to develop a good therapeutic relationship but must not allow themselves to be bias. ...read more.

Conclusion

With the more environmental therapy the psychologists would include working with the surrounding people as well as the immediate child. Another issue is looking at not only identifying the problems that the child is experiencing but also ways in which this behaviour can be modified. The therapist may arrange schedules of rewards, withholding of rewards and punishment to achieve this modification. 'Given these two major dimensions along with different types of therapy vary, it can be seen that therapy with children is not a unified area, with universal approaches and frames of reference. It is one of the areas within applied psychology where the disagreements between practioners of different theoretical persuasions are at least as great as any commonality in method.' (Oates, Hoghughi, Dallos, 1995) As it can be seen by the evidence illustrated looking at children's problems, identifying the issues and providing the most suitable form of therapy is a difficult and complicated process. To obtain a clinical formulation, characteristics such as the child's surrounding environment, comparison of behaviourisms, expectations of the family and individual characteristics need to be taken into consideration. My perspective is that children's behaviour is influenced by a social context and is troublesome as well as troubled, disorderly as well as disordered. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Child Development section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Child Development essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Child Development - Child Study

    4 star(s)

    This can turn to anger and frustration when he cannot have what he wants. This is usually when playing with his brothers and they have something he wants. Jack will turn to his mum and expect her to get the toy or game for him.

  2. Describe how political ideology influences social policy and suggest how this may affect families ...

    Draw some justified conclusions based on the evidence you have presented stating which changes you think had the most impact on families with young children. Pascall (1986 p 198) citied in Muncie et al (1997) identifies 3 main features of Old Labour's family ideology on which she argues the Beveridge reforms were based: 1.

  1. Child development - Study of a child

    Alanya was happy at the park and she enjoyed it very much, I think she will go again and next time we will take her brother. Emotional Development I think Alanya was happy that she didn't go the park with Cameran but I think she missed him been there, because

  2. What are the essential qualities of a good Montessori teacher, and why are these ...

    - -discovery of the child, Chap 10, The teacher, page 152 In order to achieve this, the Montessori teacher must be able to handle and present the materials with confidence. To borrow an expression, she must know the materials, "like the back of her hand."

  1. Practical Life Exercises And Why They Are Attractive To Children

    These are called "Sensitive Periods" and are apparent in the early years of childhood. This is how the child picks up a particular language from his adults even before he learns to read and write. The child has a natural curiosity to explore the environment.

  2. For my child development study I am going to observe how a child shows ...

    Hilary was confused on where to put the pieces and how they fitted in. To help her I showed her where they would go and she would push them in. In Hilary's house the door knobs are much taller than Hilary so she cannot reach them.

  1. Development through the life stages

    At the ages of 4 and through, they will start to enjoy life, because this is the age where you can actually remember parts of your childhood when you grow up. They feel secure, safe and happy. They start to express feelings more, and they are clear to them.

  2. Child development study - I will compare my visits and look at Aroushs development ...

    According to http://www.uic.edu/classes/sped/sped506/milestones.html toddlers between the ages of 12 and 18 months, need a parent of carer with them and they feel Separation anxiety when they are left alone. Possible activities for next visit This was my last visit for my child study .however for my final evaluation I will

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work