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Different types of communication in care settings

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Introduction

Different types of communication in care settings We live in a world where communication is a vital process of day to day life. Without communication the world would be in turmoil people would be in pain, there would be no jobs because you wouldn't know what to do, there would most likely be more violence and the government would not be able to look after its country because there would be no government. In care settings such as care homes for the elderly, nurseries, schools it is essential for a communication plan that is understandable by the carers and also that the client can understand the carers. In day to day live we use the same communication skills but we don't have guides or rules to follow it is a natural process and we don't tend to care about how we communicate with friends or people because you them. Communication would be useless if the person you are talking to doesn't understand for any reason so communication needs to be a two way or more process where the people you are talking to understand you and can respond. 'Communication needs to be a two-way process whereby each person attempts to understand the viewpoint of the other.' (Moonie 2005) Health & Social care GCE AS level This is where the communication cycle comes into place, this was developed to show how people listen and to use as a guide to whether the person you are trying to communicate with can understand you or is not listening. ...read more.

Middle

chairs' the carer may have to repeat themselves again but the clients are learning to listen to more than one instruction at a time. In a care home for the elderly the carer would have to use broken instructions to their clients to ensure everyone understands, the carer would be formal and polite using a normal pace of voice and a calm tone. It is important for the care workers in all care settings to remember to not use professional jargon, this is where a carer would use medical terms or professional words when talking to a client who will not understand what they are saying. This could lead the client into feeling silly for not understanding and may become isolated from the rest of the group not knowing what is going on. In verbal communication it is difficult to maintain a professional relationship with a client without using non-verbal communication. 'When we meet and talk with people, we will usually use two language systems: a verbal or spoken language and non-verbal or body language' (Moonie 2005) Health & Social care GCE AS level Non-verbal communication consists of the way a person gestures, signals, symbols a persons facial expressions, eye contact and a persons body language. People who are deaf or blind use non-verbal communication, the methods they use include British Sign Language (BSL), Makaton and Braille. A persons body language can tell a carer a lot about that person. A care worker has to analyse their own body language and others such as clients. ...read more.

Conclusion

disagree people use this system by gesturing with their hand, pointing directions some may use their gestures as a sign of authority. Tony Blair does when he makes a public speech he moves his hand openly towards the audience and when he makes a key point to his speech he clenches his fist towards himself or the table and slowly opens them towards the audience. Written communication is everything using the written word from books, Emails, text messages, magazines and letters, Braille is also a form of written communication. In a care setting this would be used by making formal statements when recording incidents they would have a book explaining their formal policies and procedures, medical records and life plan records and other records of personal choice this will also be written agreements, records of information passed between staff what they 'hand over', records of learning and achievement, service user plans and staff rotas. If this information was to be inaccurate it could result in problems such as a serious delay in meeting peoples needs and not providing the right information for other professionals to make appropriate decisions leading to the wrong care or treatment. In these days of technology and computers people can access major amounts of information via the internet people can Email or text message each other in the fraction of the time it will take a letter to arrive to that person. Records that are kept will be confidential but a client can check over parts of their information to see whether it is right or accurate. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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