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Factors that can affect self concept

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Introduction

P3 Factors that can affect self concept In this task I am going to explain what self concept is and what factors can affect self concept. Our self concept is our self identity. It is our image. The conception of who we are - it is our idea of our self. It is our conception of self. This concept of self relates to how we think about our self, and how we understand and know our self. Our self image is more how we see our self, whereas our self esteem is more how we feel about our self. The way we look at ourselves is important. The way we see ourselves in the world will affect what we do, how we act, how we are seen by others. We need a healthy and real concept and idea of ourselves to make the most of life. Self-esteem is the measurement of a person's estimation of their own worth. The most familiar labels on the scale of self-esteem are high self-esteem and low self-esteem. If you have high self-esteem, it implies that you have confidence in your own nature and abilities. ...read more.

Middle

this life stage you would be putting someone else first and also you would also be able to explore and become comfortable with your sexuality and as the individual becomes more emotionally mature long lasting relationships may start to occur. Sometimes when a partner dies this can make the individual upset and can make them lonely. This is an emotional development. Another example could be with working relationships adults build friendships with other people at their work place Appearance People regularly make assumptions about other people from what their faces look like, their body shape and their general body shape. If a person had an accident such as car crash which could have affected their face this could have a physical and emotional development on the person. If an infant had a scar on their faces when the individual reaches adolescence the individual may get bullied and this could affect their self concept and the individual may self harm but people also get bullied if they look different to other people for example if someone wore emo clothes this could be an excuse to bully the individual simply because they choose to wear different clothing .With adulthood people still ...read more.

Conclusion

will be left out because all of the other children would have that toy or game and the child doesn't and the individual would not know what their friends are talking about because they have not played that game or toy. Another example could be a teenager could be looking at a magazine and they see how skinny a model looks and the individual would start to doubt how they look and they could develop an eating disorder (such as becoming bulimic and anorexia) which could affect their physical, emotional and social development . With later adulthood it can make the individual think negatively and positively because by watching or reading magazines or the TV it could make them think back to what they were like when they were younger and how great it was but on the negative side it could make them feel depressed because they are older now and would have grey hair and wrinkles. This could affect them in an emotional way because there are stereotypes of what the older generation should look like and this could make the individual feel bad about themselves because they do not look like this. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

There is some good work here. The key terms & the factors impacting on self-concept were correctly identified, but the difference between self concept and self image needs to be more clearly explained. There is also some use of what could be seen as stereotypical comment regarding older people which is not appropriate, particularly for a student in health & social care. Grammar & punctuation errors were also noted. Please proof-read carefully.

Marked by teacher Diane Apeah-Kubi 16/04/2013

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