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For this assignment I am going to discuss bereavement. First I will discuss how bereavement has affected Jerzy, whilst applying it to theory, then I will do the same for Helen.

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Introduction

For this assignment I am going to discuss bereavement. First I will discuss how bereavement has affected Jerzy, whilst applying it to theory, then I will do the same for Helen. The death of a spouse has to be one of the most stressful changes you will ever experience. Your spouse was probably the most important person in your life, possibly for many years. You may not remember much of your single life before you were married; now you must live with the loss. Jerzy has been through a lot with his wife, Word War Two, refugee status in three different countries before settling down in England. When somebody dies after a long illness, the time which leads up to death is often difficult for those who care for them. When you lose somebody as a result of a long, wasting illness such as cancer, it is often very hard to keep the reality alive in your mind of what this person was once like. Death in the end may seem a relief, and this feeling can conflict with the sadness that you always expected to feel Living with Grief by Dr Tony Lake (1984) London, Sheldon Press Jerzy is suffering from distorted bereavement, which describes an exaggerated aspect of grieving, commonly anger or guilt, which prevents the expression of other feelings such as sorrow and yearning. ...read more.

Middle

Harbaugh, PH.D. (1990) Floriday, Health Communication, Inc. Grieving for somebody who has died a sudden, unexpected death, Helen Husband, can be especially difficult. Things are left unsaid. There are no goodbyes. The unexpected death of a person can make us feel not just lonely and incomplete but also a feeling of having being rejected from the event, we feel cheated and excluded. We awaken a horror inside us that our loved ones went through so much torment and we were not there, Helen may be feeling guilty that she was not there for her husband, so she is making a conscious effort to be there for his father, that may be why she is scaling down her work commitments to devote more time to his care. The violence of a death can be reflected in a violent grieving, full of angry self-rejection and guilt. Living with Grief by Dr Tony Lake (1984) London, Sheldon Press When a partner dies it can tame many months for the survivor to realize how much is lost. When the loss is sudden (Helen husband) it may take some time for the reality of the loss to sink in. Regret and self-criticism may also occur when the survivor thinks back over the relationship. ...read more.

Conclusion

Helen is considering scaling down her work commitments is this partly due to loss of confidence, her husband may have been her rock, supporting her in everything, now he is gone she may have lost some of her confidence. Also, the feelings that Helen and Jerzy is feeling may be: angry, afraid, worried, you did not deserved what happened to you, it's unfair why you? The future is now uncertain, you will never be able to love again or to trust again, you want to wake up and fine that none of it has happened. Isolation from other people is one of the most damaging and most lasting effects of bereavement, it can take may forms, even with family around you, you can still feel isolated. This is because you feel a need to withdraw from people, to hold back from close contact, they won't understand or appreciate your special grief. Bereavement may take control of your life away from you, but grieving starts to being it back again. From the start, bereavement, and then grief, place considerable strain no only on the resources of those closest to the person who has died, but also on those assistance is needed. Grief sometimes start before the death of the person who is loved, Jerzy wife. (1,333 words) Living with Grief by Dr Tony Lake (1984) London, Sheldon Press ...read more.

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