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How does lone parenthood affect the lives of lone parents and their children

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Introduction

How does lone parenthood affect the lives of lone parents and their children? Within this essay I will firstly be exploring the aspect of loan parenthood, then looking how it affects the lives of the child whether it be areas of divorce, separation, co-habitation, death or just growing up in a one parent family, I will compare one/two of them and the outcomes it has on the child with a two parent household, looking into aspects such as how this could affect the child mentally and socially. I will then look into how lone parenthood affects the parent themselves in such areas as: income, benefits, employment, housing, day care etc. seeing how emerging policies could help. What I also want to find out from this assignment as being in a lone parent household my self (living with my mum) how the experts go on to conclude about the lack of social ability a child suffers after a parent break-up and this also makes them suffer through their education and their attainment suffers i.e not wanting to get an education, not caring. In the nineteenth century a similar proportion of families were headed by loan parents as today, but now most loan parents are divorced or separated rather then widowed. ...read more.

Middle

This why the importance of communication with your child is vital and part of healing process as there is so much going on, they may not be able to cope and what experts say the child may suffer mentally, physically and socially: General health, higher reports and frequency of diseases such as asthma, eczema. Children are more likely to report symptoms classified as psychosomatic due to keeping problems to themselves. School work, children are more likely to develop problems with school work, truancy may result and refusal in going to school depending how hard and under what circumstances the break up was for the child. Arguments with parents, children (teenagers) are more likely to argue with the parent they have stayed with (usually the mother) about anything and everything. Personal relationships, the child is less likely to go to their parent and confined in them about personal problems, more likely to go to non-resident parent (new partner). Self-esteem, children who experience their parents separating have poorer self-esteem and lower estimates of self worth which relates to difficulties In other areas of life like friendship problems needing extra help and health problems and generally feeling very unhappy. Lack of communication to the child shows a failure in recognising the problems that the child may face. ...read more.

Conclusion

1 A survey carried out in 1997 found that 1 in 20 mothers sometimes went without food to meet the need of their children, with lone mothers on income support 14 times more likely to go without ten mothers in two parent families not on benefit. Social support is health promoting and it's important there is a constant informational support out there, organisations such as gingerbread can be great source of support and social contact for the parents and children and often organise activities and social events, because lone parents are unable to access this support they represent a particularly vulnerable group, low levels of social support may at least in part be a consequence of poverty. Experiences of lone parenthood can be conflicting, negative aspects are stressed - specifically loneliness and lack of money, however there are also positive aspects of lone parenthood, such as arising as lone parents do out of difficult times are very highly valued and reflect a sense of pride and achievement. Overtime women who are lone parents do make fundamental gains arising out of their everyday experiences whilst achieving such gains, there are actively engaged in renegotiating their status in society as lone parents and in the process challenging the negative stereotypes associated with lone parenthood, in the long term this can only be beneficial for the women themselves and the children they care for. ...read more.

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