• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Impact of Ill Health on Families and Children.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Impact of Ill Health on Families and Children Ill health can cause stress within the family, especially if it is chronic or life threatening. But even short-term illnesses can cause problems in the family. "The effect of illness on the child and family will depend on: * Whether the child s at school or early years settings * The child's age and state of development * The parent/s work, whether they would need to take time off to care for the child * The illness itself, whether it is acute, chronic or life threatening * The type of treatment * Previous experiences of illness * How the family cope with the illness and the support they receive * How often the child is away from school or early years settings - this may affect their development * Whether the child needs hospitalisation." (Yvonne Nolan: BTEC National Early Years 2002). Children who are unwell, in whatever setting need extra care and attention; they will need as much reassurance as possible and more attention than usual. Sometimes when children are unwell, they "may regress to an earlier developmental stage." (Penny Tassoni: Child Care and Education). They often become clingy and have a short attention span. Most children will also sleep and rest more when they are ill. Children's needs can change when they become unwell. This can be a temporary change, as in an acute illness, or may be a profound change, as in a long-term or life-threatening illness. When a child is ill they still need the security of a routine to continue. Drinks, meals and rest times should where possible, continue at the usual times. If the parent cannot care for the child, then a familiar adult needs to be around and any comfort objects to help the child feel secure. Most children who are unwell will be cared for at home because this is a place that can provide them with security, comforts and attention, which they require. ...read more.

Middle

Children often play with toys and read books, which are suitable for a younger age group when unwell, and the carer needs to play appropriate activities throughout the day such as drawing and colouring, which can be provided for children of any age. Books are good as children often have favourite stories that they like to have and read to them. Play dough can help children express their feelings and frustrations and keep the child stimulated creatively by making different shapes, houses, objects, animals etc. "Friendships can also suffer if a child has frequent prolonged absences from nursery or school." (Sandy Green: BTEC National Early Years 2002). It is important that friends should be encouraged to visit the child, if possible, letter writing, e-mailing or sending pictures to each other cab also help sustain friendships. Even short- term illness can cause disruption to family life and the normal daily routine of the household and it can be a very worrying time for parents. If the child's parents work, alternative care may need to be arranged. Chronic, long-term and life-threatening illnesses may cause the family to make adaptations to many aspects of their lives to meet the needs of the child and other family members. Parents may go through grieving pr "A child's illness may therefore affect the family in the following ways: * Physically: it can be physically demanding to care for an unwell child, especially if any lifting is required. Sleep deprivation can also lead to exhaustion. * Emotionally: there is always a multitude of emotions, such as fear, uncertainty, anxiety, insecurity, guilt, depression, which arise when a child is ill, especially when there is long-term illness, or if hospitalisation is required. * Financially: if a parent has to give up work either temporarily or permanently, it can have huge financial implications n the family. If a child is in hospital, this can also cause more expense. ...read more.

Conclusion

As with the problems and issues of the individual, those of the family are often interrelated and thus may be more complex in reality than presented here. In the family, isolation and loneliness occur when other family members and friends do not come, or when they come and do not help or do not seem to have an appreciation for what everyone is going through. Some visitors expect to be entertained as if nothing of import was happening; others want the patient and family to be cheerful or "positive." In either case, the visit is not particularly helpful. Families that were never very social or involved in church or community activities tend to become less social and may receive little social support. Especially in the later stages of disease, the overwhelming physical and emotional demands of giving care means that there is little opportunity or inclination for social contact. The amount of work and the stress of giving care in later stages are hard to exaggerate. No matter how many people are around, in the later stages, the primary caregiver is likely to feel isolated. Families most prone to depression include those in which: there is unresolved grief or conflict, one or both spouses are alcoholic, or when there is a history of depression. Many of the symptoms of depression are similar to characteristics of people who are caring for a person with terminal illness. These include deep sadness, fatigue, and inability to experience pleasure, feelings of helplessness and worthlessness, and difficulty sleeping. These characteristics also are manifestations of grief. Caring for a loved one with terminal illness is physically, emotionally, and spiritually tiring well beyond what many people expect, especially when one family member has total responsibility for the care. There is often a cyclical nature to the fatigue, beginning with physical labour and sleep loss. The labour is harder and sleep more difficult because of associated grief and anxiety. Isolation is a common complicating factor. The caregiver's schedule of leisure activities and other work and is also altered, thus further compromising her or his energy and abilities. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Child Development section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Child Development essays

  1. Describe how political ideology influences social policy and suggest how this may affect families ...

    New Labours ideology of the family is based on the belief that the married, working, heterosexual couple, together with their children is the ideal type of relationship to achieve stability in the family and society on the whole. This can be seen in the policy commitment to strengthen the institution of marriage.

  2. How to establish and maintain a healthy, safe and secure environment for children

    the welfare and safety for children and young people who may be at risk. Another act which does a similar thing to the Children act 2004 is the Childcare act 2006. Risks In any Childcare facility or establishment there will always be an element of risk, weather it is running in the playground or climbing on the apparatus.

  1. Why family structures are changing.

    leave the relationship leading to more people have different sexual partners and if people continue not to use contraception there will be cases arising where half brother and half sister are getting together due to some peoples ignorance, however this is an extreme case but it will begin to become

  2. Health, Social Care and Early years provisions.

    In order to achieve this they have to offer a wide range of additional services to their clients along with their own. In the diagram below you can see the services in which are on offer to the clients of Foulger's house: All the things stated above are thing in

  1. Health and Social care

    public services to intervene not just after but before ill health occurs. 6. Respecting the confidentiality of individual patients and providing open access to information about services, treatment and performance- patient confidentiality will be respected throughout the process of care. Information about health and healthcare services will always be available.

  2. Child A has varied needs and I have planned as shown in the assignment ...

    Children enjoy the physical aspects of learning for example, when children are being told a story they are likely to remember it more if they have been able to take part using puppets or acting the story out. The Teaching Assistant can foster independence by assisting the child to increase

  1. The main aim of this paper is to compare and contrast parental rights and ...

    an irregular union, the children will be affiliated to their mother's clan. In Kasasi v Bakaimani46, the putative father of an illegitimate child wanted the child to be affiliated to his clan. The relevant customary law was that of the matrilineal system in the southern region.

  2. Development through the life stages

    important to them, they may have one or two ?best friends?, dating and romantic relationships are commonplace. 16 year olds, relationships with their family is easy and giving. They feel comfortable in their own skin, secure sense of self. They start to view parents as people, rather than rule-makers.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work