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Legal & Welfare

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Introduction

Task 1: Classification of a child: A child is any person who is under the age of 18 and who is still under parental care. However a child is called different names (teenagers, adolescent ...) depending on their age. Even if they are between 13 -18 they are still classified as a child but they are considered more mature and older children. Summary of the Children's Act (1989): The Children Act came into force on the 14th of October 1991 and aims to protect the children using the parental responsibility. This Act works with many other associations and the Government. It has a high importance of putting the child first. When is the Act put into place? � When a court or authority is making a decision about a child, they should think about what is best for the child. � Children should be bought up in their own family and not be taken away without the family's agreement unless the child is at risk. � A local authority must give a family help if the child is in need. What organisations work with the Children's Act? � Child Policy � Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) � Children's Rights Alliance for England (CRAE) How to create a safe and secure working environment: To make sure a child is in a safe place there are many measure that one can put into place. ...read more.

Middle

It began in 1986. There is also ACPC (Area Child Protection Committee), which helps children. The Social Services can get involved and maybe the Police. Code of Conduct for staff: - Do not touch any child - Do not take them off on your own (toilets) - Show appropriate behaviour at all times - Do not favour a child more than the others - Do not swear Task 2: For this task I will be identifying the characteristics of three age groups (Pre - School, 5 - 11 year olds and adolescents) including the physical, mental and behavioural characteristics as well as group dynamics and ability. I have chosen three different outdoor sporting activities and will show how they can be adapted to meet the needs of theses different age groups. The three activities are sailing, rock climbing and skiing. First of all I am going to look at the characteristics of the age groups: Pre - School 5 - 11 year olds Adolescents * Unaware of danger * Reliant on others * Non - judgemental * Forgetful * Creative * Greedy * Playful * Not self - conscious * Loud * Unaware of right or wrong * Active * Simple minded * Easily amused * Insightful * Like incentives * Low attention span * Curious * Low level of common sense * Energetic/active * Get bored easily * ...read more.

Conclusion

Different age groups need different needs. So you need to adapt your activity, and this will be easier if you get to know your group before they come on the activity. To do this you can use questionnaires that they can fill out. You need to keep it quite simple though. Some children might be more energetic than others so you need to have activities that will suit both types of children. This is so the less energetic ones don't feel left out and they can show what they are capable of. This will also allow them to enjoy the activity more. The three different age groups will also have different abilities, you will need to assess the situation before and perhaps adapt your activities so everyone can participate. Also you will need to change the complexity of the games as smaller children might not be able to do what adolescents can. When you give a briefing you need to keep it quite short as small children have a short attention spam whilst older children might think they already know what to do so they won't listen. You need to make sure everyone knows what to do as this will help prevent accidents. Hopefully haven take all this into consideration you will be able to run a successful and enjoyable for children of all ages. ?? ?? ?? ?? Elly Bryan Working with Children Paul Munion ...read more.

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