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Social Problems and social policy - Your 'solution' will be presented in a report which you are trying to convince the government that they should adopt your proposal.

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Introduction

Social Problems and Social Policy Assignment 2 Samantha Arthington Imagine that you are a member of a leading policy think tank who has been asked by the Government to propose policy solutions to a specific social problem facing the UK. Your 'solution' will be presented in a report which you are trying to convince the government that they should adopt your proposal. The specific social problem that I have chosen to look at is truancy. Truancy is a problem all over the UK and applies to the whole community, not just within schools. Many possible solutions have been endeavoured by the Government for many years, yet truancy is still an ongoing problem throughout the UK. Studies show that truancy has a high correlation with problems within work later on in life. Low attendance in jobs and losing jobs is in correlation with truants, and at a higher rate than that of high attenders at school. It is clear that the knowledge learnt in school is essential for all children and must be compulsory. Also, studies see a high correlation with truants and day time crimes. Education is essential to keeping crime rates down with young juveniles to adults. Low education creates criminals and so there must be new truancy laws put into action immediately. ...read more.

Middle

It is vital that the child receives the appropriate treatment. I think that individual rewards that have been designated to truants would work better than an overall class reward. This stops children being in competition with each other and gives specific encouragement to those who are struggling to achieve attendance. So, previously agreed awards will persuade and support improvements in attendance. Another solution would be to add some kind of support into the national curriculum which helps children to understand their problems by talking to their peers and to be able to receive help they need. Perhaps classes in psychology and sociology teaching children how to deal with social situations such as school and with the encouragement from their peers to stay in school this may make regular truants actually enjoy school. It is important that the curriculum suits the children's needs and often a regular truant's needs are not being fulfilled. One generality between truants is family problems. This can be quite varied. It can be that the parents do not encourage their child enough, although expect a miraculous perfection on the child's behalf, or it can be a weak relationship between the child and the parents. Another possibility is that it is a power struggle between the parents and the child (Weinburger et al 1973). ...read more.

Conclusion

If this solution was put into place by the Government there would instantly be a vast improvement in attendance. The solution of awards decided beforehand and agreed upon with pupils of low attendance would make a large improvement. It would provide pupils with an incentive to go to school, an incentive that the school and the curriculum does not provide already. A reward could consist of many things, whether it be a trip or an item or something academic such as less homework. Making the experience of education less stressful and more appealing can encourage children to not only go to school but also to be successful. Overall, to keep children in school, the children must feel they have no other option. The help must be provided within the school grounds if possible. If the children feel that by leaving school they will get into trouble, and always get caught then the incentive to leave school will be reduced and so will be the UK's statistics on truancy. Monitoring is another simple solution that can be put into place allowing quick action and prevention. Also, allowing the parents to take more responsibility, not just the school. But truancy is the responsibility of everyone, included society and within individual neighbourhoods. This is why truancy is a social problem. All the solutions illustrated can be easily put into place, and whilst some are more expensive than others, the expense is much less than that of a society with an uneducated future. ...read more.

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