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The aim of the observation was to see if the child was able to decenter through a present activity using the Sally-Anne Test in relation to Jean Piaget's stages

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Observation: - Matrix 2- Decentring. The observation on child A took place on the arts and crafts table inside the nursery, whilst the other children were either sleeping or outside in the garden, there were only 2 children and 3 adults present within the setting, as child A preferred to stay inside whilst the other children were in the garden. The aim of the observation was to see if the child was able to decenter through a present activity using the Sally-Anne Test in relation to Jean Piaget's stages of development. Child A was 2:6 months at the time the observation took place and is of the female sex. The method used to carry out the observation was the narrative method. As far as I know there were no implications which may have affected the intellectual development of child A during the observation. The narrative technique was used in order to record the observation; here is an accurate record of the observation: "Child A was shown two dolls and told that one doll was called Sally and the other doll was called Anne. Child A nods her head showing that she understands which doll was which. When asked "who is Sally?" she points to the doll named sally, and when asked "who is Anne?" she points to the doll named Anne, clearly at this point she knew which doll was which. Child A was instructed to give both dolls a container. She gave both dolls a container and said "one for Sally, and one for Anne." ...read more.


However when planning play has to fit the child's needs rather than to much structure with the curriculum: "Every curriculum framework and any adult planning has to ensure that the content and approaches within an early year's curriculum takes serious account of children's play rather than a bias toward high levels of structure, adult-chosen and adult-led activities." Lindon, J (2003) Child Care and Early Years Education, Thomson. * To plan an activity for intellectual development you need understand how a child develops intellectually and you have to see through a child's view of the world. You need to imagine what it is like not to know or understand what seams very obvious to you as an adult. Children have needs when it comes to their own views of what they think is right or wrong, and they find it very difficult to understand meanings. Jenny Lindon explains how important it is to see through a child's view: "Early years practitioners need a thorough understanding of how children's thinking unfolds and a willingness to see the world through a child's eyes."Lindon, J (2003) Child Care and Early Years Education, Thomson. In order to carry out this observation and promote the intellectual development skills of child A it was crucial for me to meet the individual needs of child A and treat child A with equal concern and attention to individuality without treating her the same as every child because every child is individual as proclaimed by Jenny Lindon: "Treat all children with equal concern and attention to individuality. ...read more.


for me not to label a child as hyperactive as they may only need normal adult attention and guidance, with lively and enjoyable play which I can easily provide within my recommendations. In relation to the current setting Information gained from the observations has shown child A's Intellectual development, in particular child A's ability or inability to decentre using the Sally-Anne test and was compared with abilities of other children within the setting from age range of 1-5 years. Actions will not be taken in order to develop child A's decentering skills using my recommendation because the staff agree that decentering is to advanced for the age range of children within the Nursery's setting 0-6years. This action also includes the other areas of my recommendations, as my supervisor feels that they are already doing similar activities to my recommendations for intellectual development. I used the narrative technique in order to gather information for child A's Intellectual development skills in particular to record the results of the Sally-Anne test. I found this method challenging because it was difficult to describe the developmental milestones that have been identified in the observation, as I did the observation before finding developmental milestones to relate the observation to. I also struggled with observing the child and writing everything I saw down at the same time, and trying not to miss anything at this stage it was also important for me to keep my narrative factual and objective without making and assumptions. When trying to find a conclusion I had to really look into the observation, where as with a check list the conclusion is easy to reach at a glance. ...read more.

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