• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The care needs of people at different stages of life.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE. BOOKLET 4. CARE NEEDS. Introduction. During each of the life stages, an individual will require some sort of care need that must be fulfilled. Therefore, care workers provide a specific service depending on the needs of the individual person. Care needs often depend on the age of the service user. Infancy As soon as a child is born, they require 24 hour attention by their carer. Therefore, it requires physical well- being such as being given food, warmth, shelter and sense of safety. This is the key stage when emotional relationships develop; therefore, initial relationships are important to the new born. Childhood Even during childhood, a child is very dependent on the carer for day to day care tasks, although they have gathered some independency. They still rely on their parents to provide them with an emotionally secure environment. A child's intellectual needs are met through regular attendance at school. Furthermore, a child's external relationships develop; so to keep a child sociable, social needs must be met. Adolescence As soon as a child becomes an adolescent, they are beginning to become more and more independent although they still require a secure home environment. ...read more.

Middle

Also, they helped me emotionally by keeping me in a safe and warm environment. During childhood, I became a little bit more independent. Therefore, I did not require the same care needs. I still required some physical needs such as to get fully dressed, help with finishing all my lunch, etc. My intellectual needs extended to regular reading and homework. My parents took me out on weekends to extend my social contact. Also, my family provided me with emotional support for example, with friendships in school. Now that I am in adolescence, I have become very independent physically. However, when I am ill, then I require support from parents. This is what can happen in adulthood, where you are quite independent, but still require some help. My intellectual needs are met through regular school. Emotionally, friends and family are important to keep my spirits up. This is also important during adulthood, where you are independent. Social contact is regular by going to school. When I am an adult, my care needs will be very different. This is because an adult is very independent, although they will sometimes need help as well. ...read more.

Conclusion

If a child's self- concept is damaged from an early age due to the reason that their care needs have not been met, it can cause problems later in life. Adolescence: During adolescence, an individual's self- concept becomes centred on how they look. Carers must make sure that they promote positive self- esteem by praising how they look. They must make sure that they focus on the positive traits of the adolescents, to give them a good sense of self- worth. Also, carers must provide an environment of belonging, so that adolescents feel wanted and safe. Adulthood: As an adult begins to mature, their self- concept changes according to what roles they are performing. Carers must ensure that they are supportive in order to decrease the burden of stress that an adult may be carrying. An adult who is encouraged to be competent, in the workplace for example, will do so. Furthermore, adults must feel motivated. Adults with disabilities require more physical and emotional support, in order to be able to live their lives as normally as possible. Old Age: During old age, an individual goes through many different physical, psychological and social changes. Therefore, they must be supported in order to release the stress of events which may have happened in the last three or four decades. In order to aid physical needs. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Health and Social Care section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

There is some good knowledge demonstrated here regarding the needs at different life stages. The writer is clearly aware that as we get older our needs can become greater or fewer. I would suggest that the age ranges for the various life stages are indicated - this helps any reader to understand why needs have become greater or fewer at a given stage. At times, it was not always clear what the needs were at a certain life stage especially towards old age, and there were some stereotypical comments about people which need to be amended. Nevertheless, there is some good work here and I did get a good sense of the writer's understanding of the topic.

Marked by teacher Diane Apeah-Kubi 16/04/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Health and Social Care essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Care Values Bases in Care Settings

    3 star(s)

    A code of conduct is a set of guidelines or rules that a person has to follow or stick to. * Trust - if you know that a care worker will not pass on information and keep it confidential you will fell more confident to tell them the truth and

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Analysis of One Individual's Health and Wellbeing

    To try to forget this she drinks alcohol and whenever she gets really depressed, she drinks a lot. Francine is a smoker as she got influenced by one of her friends in her teenage hood and is now addicted to it herself; she smokes about a whole packet of cigarette per day.

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Understanding effective communication

    Communication builds up relationship that the person needs to be able to listen and understand their feelings. Translator: When it comes to service user who doesnât understand English or it is not their first language it is always best that the translator can support the service userâs difficulties.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Important skills needed by Early Years Practioners. It is very important to maintain appropriate ...

    keeping them informed about how they child is developing. Some parents feel anxious when they leave they child in someone's care so they should be reassured and the practitioner will need to be polite and understanding towards the parent. Practitioner should also find ways so that the parent can come into the school and spend time in the class and see how they child spends the day.

  1. Balanced Diet according to life stages

    The way to begin this is to start off with a few teaspoons of dry plain cereal mixed with either enough formula or breast milk to make a soupy solution. Giving this once a day then finishing it off with their daily milk feed helps them to get used to the solid food slowly.

  2. Individual needs within the health and social care sector

    to a poor body image Lack of nutritional advice may lead to crash dieting or poor food choices Lack of guidance on correct exercise could lead to dizziness, breathlessness, chest pain or fainting Changes in diet may not suit the whole family and make things difficult at meal times Calorie

  1. BTEC National Diploma in Health and Social Care.

    Studies have indicated the way in which lower income families attempt to reduce the stresses of living in a deprived way are Sweets are used to comfort children, since it is quick and easy. Breast feeding may be abandoned earlier to give more time to other family members.

  2. Justify responses where child maltreatment or abuse is suspected or confirmed, referring to current ...

    The disadvantage that can be seen in the humanâs right act being part of a response to child abuse and maltreatment is sometimes due to being a child the Human Right Act can be misunderstood and acted as though it was not made for children.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work