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The events surrounding an admission to care are traumatic to all parties involved.

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Introduction

RECEIVED 65% (Graded merit upper division) Introduction. The events surrounding an admission to care are traumatic to all parties involved. I will look at how some of the actions of the professionals involved can help make the transition less stressful. Some examples of how children react to unplanned moves are given to underpin the importance of careful preplanning. People who move into residential care should do so as far as possible by positive choice, and living there should be a positive experience. Choice is important in so far as the quality of life in care will depend on the cooperation of those involved. An important implication of this is that there need be real and valid alternatives on offer, from which the client may make their choice. An older child, for example may wish to choose between a community care centre and a fostering placement or an elderly person may wish to consider the pros and cons of residential care as against remaining at home with home help support. To give the power of choice to the client is important because "it changes the fundamental dynamics of the relationship between client and professional, and on a wider scale, between the dependent person and society."(A positive Choice, 1988, p8) ...read more.

Middle

However during the investigation, assessment and risk analysis the family may have matured within the problem and owing to them being consulted, involved, and kept informed may see the necessity of placement and understand the reasons behind the decision. This is not to imply that they are happy, but begin to see things more clearly and may now be better equipped than heretofore to offer the child their support. Children moving into care experience a sense of separation and loss, and their immediate family can experience this also. This feeling of separation and loss can manifest itself in different ways and is influenced by a number of factors. The age of the child, stage of development, the attachment between child and parent, the perceptions of the reasons for the separation that the child has, the preparation for the move, the temperament of the child, and the environment from which the child is being moved. "The trauma of parental separation or losses may be lessened if the child is prepared for the transition, and if all participants in the moving process are open and honest with the child" (Fahlberg, 1996, p. 167) In my workplace we generally admit young boys who come to us through the unplanned process. ...read more.

Conclusion

Because of the dynamics of the client group a new admission is integrated slowly to the group usually mixing with a small number of boys to start. During his stay with us we maintain a daily record of our observations, devise a care plan to meet his individual needs, citing short and long-term goals, prepare case conference reports, and ultimately preplan for the boy to return home. Isolation from loved ones results in adjustment problems while in care and afterwards so it is necessary that the social care worker be aware of these factors and take steps to relieve the clients anxiety and there is no better place to start building a relationship than at the admission process. Conclusion In as far as possible people who move into care should do so by positive choice. The implications for the client, already in crisis due to their difficulties, of rushed or poor planning can be lifelong. The social worker by using his professional skills will attempt to ease the way so as to ensure the experience is less damaging to the individual. However in a centre where all admissions are unplanned the care worker takes a pivotal role in helping the client settle in and working with him during his stay to preplanning his discharge. ...read more.

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