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The two views with regards to innate knowledge that both John Locke and Plato hold, are quite different. Locke shares the view that there is no such thing as innate knowledge, and that knowledge is obtained through experiences in one's life.

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Introduction

Christopher Olsen PHI 101 July 7, 2003 The two views with regards to innate knowledge that both John Locke and Plato hold, are quite different. Locke shares the view that there is no such thing as innate knowledge, and that knowledge is obtained through experiences in one's life. Plato holds a completely different viewpoint and feels that knowledge is not something that is learned, but it is recollected. He feels that the knowledge is inside each human being, and that the individual needs to be pointed in the right direction to perhaps recall that particular knowledge. ...read more.

Middle

Secondary ideas were characterized as being in one's head and were characterized as distinguishing sweetness, roughness or color. One of the big discrepancies I found would have been Plato's views on the advancement of science or technology. By means of Empiricism, we are able to change our ideas over time as we determine that past theories are incorrect and are able to build upon new ideas, whereas Plato felt that innate knowledge was simply discovered and admit to having been wrong. It seems to me that over time we develop newer and better theories on certain subject matters, as opposed to just simply being wrong about things and all of a sudden just seeing the light with regards to the newly discovered innate knowledge. ...read more.

Conclusion

John Locke's beliefs that by experiencing things we are able to understand and solve problems to me make much more sense. For example if you took a healthy child and from the day they were born placed them in an enclosed room providing them with proper food for nourishment and growth, and you monitored that child over the years one would find that the child would have no aspects of innate knowledge. If that child were held in that room for ten years, outside of the severe psychological problems that would result from being held in such isolation, the child would be completely ignorant with regards to ...read more.

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