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'To what extent do research studies support the view that maternal deprivation can have long term effects on individuals?'

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Introduction

Maddy Haynes 1st November 2002 'To what extent do research studies support the view that maternal deprivation can have long term effects on individuals?' Maternal deprivation is when the child is deprived of love from the primary caregiver (i.e. the mother) in the early stages of development. This essay will examine the latter effects of bond disruption, and the studies that have been carried out to support it. Early attachments by the primary caregiver are important in the child's latter life. ...read more.

Middle

The results exemplify that children are affected by bond disruption in early development. Bowlby later in 1952 drew up the 'Maternal deprivation hypothesis' acknowledging the results he had found earlier. In this hypothesis, Bowlby focuses on the effects of deprivation and the needs of a child. The hypothesis states that if a child has not been able to form "a warm and continuous attachment with his primary care giver" (mother), then he will find it difficult forming relationships with other people. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also not all research shows that separation leads to maladjustment, in 1956 Bowlby found no such ill effects caused. In 1981, Rutter suggested that behavioural problems were the result of broken homes causing disharmony, rather than the separation. Rutter did a study on over 2,000 boys aged between 9 and 12, who had all experienced separation whether it be from physical illness, death of mother, psychiatric illness, or discord within the family. Rutter found that the boys were four times more likely to become delinquent rather than when separation was caused by illness. This supports Rutter's hypothesis that it is family discord rather than separation on its own, which cause delinquency and emotional maladjustment. ...read more.

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