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What are the significant differences between parenting in a two parent family and a family where the parents live apart?

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What are the significant differences between parenting in a two parent family and a family where the parents live apart? Is 'shared parenting' by separated parents feasible? Introduction What constitutes a family according to the different theories: Key features of each. Start by examining traditional family models, for example, nuclear, or extended? How are they structured? How has modernization and feminism for example influenced changes in the roles that each parent plays in a family? And how has this affected the structure of the family? With these factors in mind how does separation of the parents impact on the normative view of the family? Has society's increased acceptance of divorce and alternative family forms increased divorce rates? Is our society evolving to create a new model for family life and alternative methods of parenting? Differences in parenting in a two parent family, and a family where the parents live apart. What are the commonly accepted roles of each parent in a two parent family? ...read more.


Is there a possibility of resentment towards one or both of the parents? Conclusion Summary of the evidence discussed as to whether or not there is a difference between parenting in a two parent family and in one where the parents live apart. And whether or not, it has been found to be feasible for parents to share the care of their children after separation. References Amato, P. (1987).Children in Australian Families: The Growth of Competence. Melbourne: Prentice-Hall. Amato, P. (1997). A Generation at Risk. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Amato, P. (2000) 'The Consequences of Divorce for Adults and Children', Journal of Marriage and the Family 62(4): 1269-88. Amato, P. & Booth, A. (1996), "A prospective study of divorce and parent-child relationships", Journal of Marriage and the Family, vol. 58, pp. 356-365. Amato, P and Keith, B. (1991). 'Parental Divorce and the Well-Being of Children: A Meta-Analysis.' Psychological Bulletin, Volume 110 (1):26-46 Amato, P. ...read more.


Journal of Sociology, Volume 41(1):69-86. Katz, L and Woodin, E. (2002). 'Hostility, hostile detachment, and conflict engagement in marriages: Effects on child and family functioning. Child Development, vol 73(2):636-651 McDonald, P. (2003) 'Transformations of the Australian Family', pp. 77-103 in S. Khoo and P. McDonald (eds) The Transformation of Australia's Population: 1970-2030. Sydney: UNSW Press. Smyth, B. (2005). 'Parent-child contact schedules after divorce.' Family Matters, Issue 69. Teachman, J.D. (2002) 'Childhood Living Arrangements and the Intergenerational Transmission of Divorce', Journal of Marriage and the Family 64(3): 86-112. Thornberry,T.P.,Freeman-Gallant,A.,Lizotte,A.J.,Krohn,M.D and Smith,C.A.(2003). 'Linked Lives: The Intergenerational Transmission of Antisocial Behavior' Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 31(2): 171-184. Van Ijzendoorn,M.,Tavecchio,L.,Stams,G.,Verhoeven,M and Reiling,E.(1998). 'Attunement between parents and professional caregivers: A comparison of child rearing attitudes in different child care settings.' Journal of Marriage and the family, vol 60:771-781. White, L. (1994). 'Growing up with single parents and stepparents: Long term effects on family solidarity.' Journal of Marriage and the Family, Volume56 (4), p 935. Wise, S. (2003). 'Family structure, child outcomes and environmental mediators. An overview of the development in diverse families study.' Australian Institute of Family Studies, Research paperno.30. ...read more.

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