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Working with Children - settings, legislation and values.

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Introduction

E1 When discussing what types of setting which provide care and education, you need to take into consideration the different types such as statutory sectors, voluntary sectors and private sectors. Statutory sectors are services which have to be provided by law for children and families, this requires the government or local authorities to provided them. A statutory sector is like school (private not included) it must be provide and must be attended to as this is a vital learning programme of life. E.g. you attend pre schools to write, learn simple mathematics then you attend school to advance on the skills learnt and get ready for when you leave school. Voluntary sectors are services that are organisations such as charities where some or all of their funding comes from donations. Voluntary sectors are places like barnardos, childline and the children?s society. Local voluntary sectors are places such as NSPCC and The Leeds Community Foundation which aims to improve the quality of life of local people in Leeds. Private sectors are profit making services. Private sectors are services such as nannies and childminders. Local private sectors are places like children?s centres such as wacky warehouse, go hyper they are also places like independent (private) schools such as dale house school in Batley. E2 Statutory sectors aim to support children and their families by providing the children with education this is to ensure they get the education they are expected to and also by additional support such as listening to the child or young person?s experience and providing them with the appropriate support (this may include emotional support, physical health and wellbeing) which will help them understand their situation and to help them overcome any behaviours that come as a result to the problem. Voluntary sectors such a NSPCC aim to support children by getting to the bottom of the situation what the child is in, they will provide services what support the child depending on the situation they also set up events and they come to school and talk to you and encourage you to talk to people. ...read more.

Middle

2. Preparation skills- When working with children preparation is a vital skill. This is because when you become to teach children you need to prepare the lesson, you need to create worksheets, go in early set up the room. If you don?t come prepared you will have to prepare when your there and that doesn?t look professional. This is important in college so you can keep your work in order and not get confused, it is important in placement so you can prepare for lessons and also so you are not getting confused. E8 References (Children's Care, Learning and Development NVQ 2 ,Marian Beaver , Jo Brewster , Sally Neaum , Jill Tallack , Amanda Booty , Heidi Sheppard, Nov 2005) (Cache level 3 child care and education, Marian Beaver Jo Brewster Sally Neaum , Jill Tallack , Sandy Green , Heidi Sheppard, Miranda Walker ,page 313, Nov 2008) ( Squire,Gill,28 June 2007,Child Care, Learning & Development, Heinemann,Page 5, June 2007) Bibliography Domestic Abuse Resources and Training for Schools in Scotland, What schools can do to support children and families affected by domestic abuse,http://www.dartsscotland.org/WhatSchoolsCanDo,25.09.2012 UNICEF UK,2010, UNICEF UK,http://www.unicef.org.uk/UNICEFs-Work/Our-mission/Childrens-rights/,25.09.2012 Wikipedia, Convention on the Rights of the Child,http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convention_on_the_Rights_of_the_Child, 01.10.2012 EFQM, Common Assessment Framework F&Q, http://www.eipa.nl/CAF/FAQ/CAF_FAQ.html,01.10.2012 D1 When working with parents/carers it is an essential part of our role as practitioners to maintain a healthy relationship, this is so the parent/carer knows their child is safe and so they can trust you with their children?s health and well being and trust you to take general care of the child while they attend the setting. Parents/carers need to be able to confine in you as practitioners to be able to listen to their advice and needs regarding their child and be able to create a relationship of trust and respect. Building trust with parents and other professionals is one of the most important values to building relationships this involves having good communication, maintaining confidentiality and professionalism and ensuring the children are in a safe environment while receiving high standards of care. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is our job as practitioners to ensure that children?s needs are met, that they have a say, and that their welfare and health is our main concern. Children need stability and it is our responsibility to ensure that it is there. We need to be including the child in everything and letting them have a say. We need to listen to the child to ensure they are enjoying where they are and what they are doing. Such as if one child likes football and one doesn?t at all you need to make it fair for instance play football on day then rounder?s or something so it is making it fair and so the child knows that their interests have been inputted when deciding the topic. By working in a person centred, inclusive way you are looking at the whole person, their abilities, strengths, interests and learning style, as well as any learning needs or disabilities. It requires children and young people to be active and responsible participants in their learning, giving them a say in their learning through target setting, choice and decision making. This gives them a sense of ownership and enables them to become more proactive in their learning and to be more in control. This in turn gives them the motivation to learn ? they can see where they are, where they want to be and the steps they need to take to get there. By being person centred and inclusive you are not restrictive, but allow for learning opportunities that suit the child because you plan and target set with them. This creates a closer match between the child and the curriculum, allowing them to learn and develop at their own level and build on their knowledge. Ensure that you are including the children?s families. Children always feel better when their families are there, they feel more comfortable and this is really important when working with children. ________________ | Page Chloe Moseley ...read more.

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