• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

3rd September 1939 saw the beginning of World War Two, meaning the two countries involved, Britain and Germany, were about to go down in history for one of the most brutal acts of war known to man.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

3rd September 1939 saw the beginning of World War Two, meaning the two countries involved, Britain and Germany, were about to go down in history for one of the most brutal acts of war known to man. After the Munich agreement, signed in September 1938, it had became apparent to the many leaders of Europe that the forthcoming war had been prevented. However, after Germany's invasion of Poland on the 1st September 1939, it then became clear that a second world war was inevitable. It was later revealed that the British government had started to prepare for a possible war long before it actually happened, they had witnessed the new technology developed by Germany during the Spanish civil war that was threatening Britain and had observed the mass destruction that blitzkrieg, the lightening war, had already caused and could possibly cause to Britain if allowed. Because of this the British government began to take precautions. There was no other option if they were to avoid nationwide casualties caused by German air raids. The most well-known of these measures was evacuation. Evacuation was introduced into Britain on the 1st September 1939. It consisted of the transporting of children from major cities to safe areas in the country side of Britain. These major cities were no longer considered safe for British children. ...read more.

Middle

Britain would then be alone in the event of an attack and along with that the German luftwaffe were only 22 miles away from Britain giving Britain a clear disadvantage. Germany began to re-arm in 1935, after agreeing to do so in an agreement with Britain. To support this, in the same year Germany introduced conscription. Also, the luftwaffe were re-arming very quickly; a lot quicker than the British air force. This was another reason for the introduction of evacuation. If the luftwaffe became more powerful than the RAF, which was looking possible, this would give Britain the inability to sufficiently defend itself in the event of an air attack. The major target for the luftwaffe was the major cities of Britain. This was because of the dense population, if the main cities were attacked then the whole country would be made aware of the severity of Britain's troubles, this would lower morale. Also, munitions factories were set in the city, if these were targeted and struck then this would reduce the resources available to Britain. Another main reason for the government to introduce evacuation into Britain was that it would free the parents of children to play their part in the effort against Germany whilst not having their children to distract them. Britain also felt it was necessary for the positive economic effects it would have. ...read more.

Conclusion

For example, 'blackout.' In this people were to blacken out all of their windows so that Germans would not be able to see their targets in the dark. For this, anything could be used, as long as the light from inside the house did not leave. It was left up to the occupants of the house to deal with this however they wanted. Along with the blackout, more direct precautions were introduced to deal with the German threat first hand. The gas mask was issued to everybody, it even became an offence not to carry one, though gas was never used. Bomb shelters were another form of primary protection; there was two types of shelter, the Anderson shelter and the Morrison shelter. People in the city were advised to use suitable buildings that were already there, to avoid having to overspend war funds on bomb shelters. Blackouts were used to keep light invisible from any German attack, this was also done by removing streetlamps and headlights from motor vehicles. Sign posts were removed also, to confuse any Germans lost or strategically placed behind our lines. The British government introduced evacuation into it's major cities as one of many precautionary methods that was used to protect the millions of innocent civilians and to take as many steps necessary to prevent the deadly aerial assaults that Germany had the potential to unleash, which would destroy Britain and a majority of it's population. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. Evacuation in Britain during the Second World War

    families to host, so that the evacuees will be out of the "danger-zone, where desperate peril may come at any minute." This shows that not many people were hosting in Scotland, possibly because they thought that Scotland was too remote to be attacked.

  2. Women in world war one

    This decrease suggests that the 500,000 workers lost, went on to work in the other fields that needed workers. Therefore showing that women were abandoning their responsibilities or rather the responsibility society had appointed to them. The jobs were not the only things that kept women motivated and grateful in their new fields of work.

  1. World war 1

    I agree with this statement to a certain extent because the all playing a part in breaking the stalemate, however I think the American entry into the war was the most important factor. The USA entered the war on the Allied side in April 1917.

  2. womens crsk history

    Another reason as to why Sources C and A disagree is that both of the Sources differ on the actual message that they are trying to give out to the public. If you look closely at Source C, you can see a poster saying Votes for Women, and underneath this, it says "back in an hour or so".

  1. (TM)Why did Britain fail to confront Germany over the occupation of the Czech city ...

    However, the Polish guarantee has been deemed worthy of criticism, and many people at the time felt that Britain should not pledge support to a country with a right-wing, military dictatorship. The foreign minister of Poland, Benes, was considered untrustworthy and furthermore, the only ally in Poland's recent past had been Germany.

  2. Assignment Two: Objectives two and three

    Source B also shows soldiers and presumably relatives looking over the bodies of the dead girl's. This shows how some people were badly effected by the Blitz. Source C is not very useful in helping me to understand the effects of the blitz, because it is unreliable, as it looks staged.

  1. Evacuation in Britain during World War II

    I have a good idea of why the government sent evacuees to these places as supported in my analysis of source four but the source cannot tell me this. All the places listed in this source I would class as 'Safe Places' and as you can see in source 1

  2. Modern history

    By 1908, militancy was taken to such extremes such as the fated attempt by Emily Davidson in 1913 where she dove before the King's race horse. The attacks became spontaneous, sparking off without the consent of the leadership, reinforced by the riots of Black Friday where 300 women became involved in bloody fighting.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work