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A modern world study – Northern Ireland

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Introduction

G.C.S.E. HISTORY COURSEWORK OBJECTIVE 3 A modern world study - Northern Ireland Topic: CONFLICT IN IRELAND 1. According to source A, Catholics specifically in Belfast and Fermanagh face a disadvantage in employment. Source A suggest that less Catholics are employed and the evidence for this is that in a Belfast shipyard which is the biggest source of employment there are only 400 Catholics out of the total 10,000. If it is hard for Catholics to find jobs at the biggest source of employment then how are they going to find jobs in the smaller ones? Although the Catholics were rejected when they went to seek for jobs, it was a hard thing to prove they are been prejudiced. In addition, in a Fermanagh county council Protestants occupied most of the posts including the top ones. However, the source goes on to say that, "The population of Fermanagh was more than half catholic ". With this evidence it is obvious the Catholics were at a real disadvantage. 2. There is not much evidence in sources B, C and D to suggest there was anti-catholic prejudice in Northern Ireland although they all do have similar patterns. ...read more.

Middle

First of all, the civil rights movement was set up by a group of young Catholics to speed up the ideas of O'Neill's reforms. Since Londonderry was a catholic dominated area, the civil rights movement decided to base there because they expected the to find out what they were looking for there. The aims of this movement were: * To end unfair voting practise. * To demand a fair system of allocating housing this will cause an end to discrimination. * End to gerrymandering, which is creating boundaries to elections. Their methods of working were marching to demonstrate. In sources H, I and J there are a lot of evidence to support the aims of the civil rights movement. In source H, is a photograph of the house of a catholic family taken in Londonderry in the 1960's. It shows the poor living conditions of this family. The evidence for this is the poor building shown and the state of the bath outside. This supported the civil rights movement's aim of fair system of allocating housing since the Protestants were always allocated the best housing. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think the cartoonist believes that those dates or events are what is keeping the people divided. Basically, the cartoonist believes history is dividing the people. According to the cartoonist the troubles continued for a number of reasons: 1916- the Easter rising which was set up by a Fenian group and the Irish republican brotherhood because they decided that the war was a good opportunity to stage an armed uprising against the British. The rising started on Easter Monday when the nationalist's rebels seized power of the centre of Dublin. The British army executed the leaders and this has kept the catholics angry up till today and they still remember what happened that particular day. 1690- what happened on July 1st, William of orange's victory has remained a part of today's conflict. Because of that many modern Protestants still have a defensive and suspicious attitude to Catholics. The Protestants believe that William's victory at the battle of the Boyne saved Protestants from destruction at the hands of their catholic enemies. I agree` with the cartoonist's interpretation as I think the people in Ireland have been fighting and suffering as part of a violent argument in Ireland's past and therefore they are trying to reliving it in different ways to gain freedom. ?? ?? ?? ?? I ...read more.

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