• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A modern world study – Northern Ireland

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

G.C.S.E. HISTORY COURSEWORK OBJECTIVE 3 A modern world study - Northern Ireland Topic: CONFLICT IN IRELAND 1. According to source A, Catholics specifically in Belfast and Fermanagh face a disadvantage in employment. Source A suggest that less Catholics are employed and the evidence for this is that in a Belfast shipyard which is the biggest source of employment there are only 400 Catholics out of the total 10,000. If it is hard for Catholics to find jobs at the biggest source of employment then how are they going to find jobs in the smaller ones? Although the Catholics were rejected when they went to seek for jobs, it was a hard thing to prove they are been prejudiced. In addition, in a Fermanagh county council Protestants occupied most of the posts including the top ones. However, the source goes on to say that, "The population of Fermanagh was more than half catholic ". With this evidence it is obvious the Catholics were at a real disadvantage. 2. There is not much evidence in sources B, C and D to suggest there was anti-catholic prejudice in Northern Ireland although they all do have similar patterns. ...read more.

Middle

First of all, the civil rights movement was set up by a group of young Catholics to speed up the ideas of O'Neill's reforms. Since Londonderry was a catholic dominated area, the civil rights movement decided to base there because they expected the to find out what they were looking for there. The aims of this movement were: * To end unfair voting practise. * To demand a fair system of allocating housing this will cause an end to discrimination. * End to gerrymandering, which is creating boundaries to elections. Their methods of working were marching to demonstrate. In sources H, I and J there are a lot of evidence to support the aims of the civil rights movement. In source H, is a photograph of the house of a catholic family taken in Londonderry in the 1960's. It shows the poor living conditions of this family. The evidence for this is the poor building shown and the state of the bath outside. This supported the civil rights movement's aim of fair system of allocating housing since the Protestants were always allocated the best housing. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think the cartoonist believes that those dates or events are what is keeping the people divided. Basically, the cartoonist believes history is dividing the people. According to the cartoonist the troubles continued for a number of reasons: 1916- the Easter rising which was set up by a Fenian group and the Irish republican brotherhood because they decided that the war was a good opportunity to stage an armed uprising against the British. The rising started on Easter Monday when the nationalist's rebels seized power of the centre of Dublin. The British army executed the leaders and this has kept the catholics angry up till today and they still remember what happened that particular day. 1690- what happened on July 1st, William of orange's victory has remained a part of today's conflict. Because of that many modern Protestants still have a defensive and suspicious attitude to Catholics. The Protestants believe that William's victory at the battle of the Boyne saved Protestants from destruction at the hands of their catholic enemies. I agree` with the cartoonist's interpretation as I think the people in Ireland have been fighting and suffering as part of a violent argument in Ireland's past and therefore they are trying to reliving it in different ways to gain freedom. ?? ?? ?? ?? I ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Catholic discrimination in Northern Ireland in terms of Housing and Employment

    5 star(s)

    This means that there was a lot of discrimination as houses that were built in Protestant districts nearly all went to Protestants.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Ireland and World War 1

    3 star(s)

    The British military leader, Lord Kitcher, was glad to have Ulster Unionists in the army but he wanted them to join existing regiments. Carson (who,with Craig, was in the War Office with Kitcher) disagreed, he wanted the Ulstermen to be kept together, organized like the UVF.

  1. The History of Conflict in Ireland.

    They where the true Republicans, whereas the Officials represented something which belonged to a world out there, but had nothing to do with everyday life in the streets of Belfast or Derry. The Republican movement has always identified itself as being working class because those are the people it has had to defend.

  2. Civil Rights in Northern Ireland Coursework

    highly reliable source because he is not biased and cannot gain from what he is saying. This source also assesses the extent of the discrimination by showing it at a social and recreational level, not just a political perspective. Illustrating how discrimination against Catholics has now become so institutionalised it affects all people and all areas of life.

  1. Modern world study - Conflict in Ireland

    One of the main short term causes however was the way in which the younger generations of both faiths were being brought up. Both Protestant and Catholic communities kept their children separated from children of the other religion, both by sending them to single faith schools such as Holy Cross,

  2. Ireland - Modern World Study

    In the late 18th Century some Ulster Presbyterians had been among the first Irish Nationalists. While a small number of protestants continued to support nationalism, during the 19th Century most Protestants became supporters of the link with Britain. They became known as Unionists because they wanted to maintain the Parliamentary Union with Britain.

  1. Modern World Study: Conflict in Ireland

    The British parliament tried to combat this by setting up a convention which lasted about a year before Sinn Fein stopped it. In the general election of 1918 Sinn Fein won 73 seats and the Nationalists 7 and Ulster 23.

  2. Modern World Study- Conflict in Ireland

    Instead of gathering at dawn so that not as many people saw them, the rebels marched at midday in full view of everyone on the bank holiday. They were proud of what they were doing. They seized the General Post Office, as well as more than 10 other buildings, on

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work