• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Women over the age of 30 gained the vote in 1918 mainly because of womens contribution to the war effort. Do you agree?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"Women over the age of 30 gained the vote in 1918 mainly because of women's contribution to the war effort." Do you agree? In 1918 due to women's contributions to the war effort, the Representation of the People Act was passed. It entitled women over the age of 30, with certain property qualifications to vote and be eligible to become MPs. The campaign for women's suffrage had developed after 1870 with the Suffragist's peaceful campaigning and then the later Suffragette's more violent and militant campaigning. This campaigning had endured 50 years but was put on hold in 1914 so that women could contribute for the war effort. The war was the main reason for women getting the vote in 1918, however, to some extent the role of the campaign for women's suffrage, the changing attitudes and the Representation of the People Act itself aided towards women getting the vote in 1918. The women's suffrage movements helped women gain the vote to some extent. The NUWSS made the issue of women's suffrage national for the first time as it brought together the various suffrage groups in 1886. ...read more.

Middle

Furthermore, another important reason why women's contributions to the war effort was very important for giving women the vote in 1918 was that the jobs women did were dangerous men jobs. By the end of the war, 1.5 million women worked in munition factories. This work lasted long hours and put women under physical and mental pressure. Exposure to dangerous chemicals such as phosphorus turned many of the workers skin yellow, resulting in the nickname of 'canaries'. In 1916, 191 case of toxic poisoning was reported with 52 being fatal. The fact that women s readily undertook these crucial, but highly dangerous occupations demonstrated that they were just as concerned about the nation's well being as their male counterparts fighting at the frontlines. This no doubt compelled the government to reconsider the extent of the political inequality they maintained between men and women. On the other hand, women's contributions to the war effort may not have been the most important reason as the vast majority of women who contributed to the war effort would still not be able to vote after 1918. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, women gained the vote in 1918 because of their contributions to the war effort. Women originally could not vote due to traditional stereotypes, but these stereotypes gradually started shifting as women's status in society began to change. As a result of this, women over 30 would have eventually gained suffrage with women's contributions to the war effort acting as only a catalyst rather than the cause. The act itself was also important for women gaining suffrage as it meant that voting laws had to be changed, hence allowing women to gain suffrage. On the other hand, if it was not for women's contributions to the war effort the government would have remained reluctant to give women the vote due to the tensions generated through the suffrage movements. Women's contribution to the war effort, however, was the main reason why women were granted the right to vote as it defused the deadlock between the Suffrage campaigners and the government. Therefore had it not been for women's contribution to the war effort, the government would have continued to refuse women the right to women. ?? ?? ?? ?? Seran Hakki 11/J2 1 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    ''Without the First World War British women would not have gained the right to ...

    5 star(s)

    I think that the Suffragettes would have been successful in getting British women the vote if the war had not happened, because their shock tactics gave them huge publicity showing how proactive women could be, though not necessarily in 1918.

  2. Votes for Women

    Most likely to be the most important of the reasons why the war may not have been a cause is because of the introduction of the new electoral register (other wise known as the Representation of the People Act) in 1918 and.

  1. Why did women fail to gain the vote between 1900-1914?

    This event also brought the Suffragettes a lot of attention but it was not all good, lots of people particularly the more upper-class citizens of the country regarded it as sabotage and attempted murder of a horse and a jockey.

  2. Suffragettes and the Vote.

    People said that they were terrorists. Which they were. The government could not be seen to be giving in to terrorism. Especially because there was a fear of trouble brewing in Ireland and that would set a bad example to them.

  1. To what extent did the work done by women during World War 1 gain ...

    women were unworthy of the vote, as their lack of intellect made them incapable of political decision and would vote Conservative if they were given the vote15. The women's Suffrage movement comprised two strands, the moderate strand developed from the ideals of Millicent Garrett Fawcett and the better known "suffragettes"

  2. The First World War, and the womans actions during it, was the key reason ...

    Source E is interesting in the way that it does not directly mention the impacts of the First World War on women's rights. It suggests that neither the peaceful campaigning of the NUWSS, nor the 'militant actions' of the WSPU were responsible for gaining women the vote: '...women were not granted the vote.'

  1. Votes For Women

    occupations and roles women did as part of the war effort, for example joining nursing units like the FANY. Some would ask why women chose to go and work in the munitions factories after they were turned down at the start of the war and when there were so many risks involved.

  2. History Revision for year 11. The Liberal Reforms, the Beveridge Reforms and the ...

    This immediately suggested that the government was giving education greater priority. All fees for state schools were abolished and the school leaving age was raised to fifteen. This meant that all children would attend secondary schools for the first time.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work