• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

All these sources Refer to one city in Northern Ireland. Why did This City Become the Centre of the Civil Rights Movements in Northern Ireland?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Study Sources D E and F. All these sources Refer to one city in Northern Ireland. Why did This City Become the Centre of the Civil Rights Movements in Northern Ireland? The aim of the civil Rights Movement was to get everyone in Northern Ireland to have equal Rights. These included discrimination against employment, housing, law, voting and others. The Catholics of Londonderry faced a number of long and short problems, which saw many join the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960's. However many Protestants faced the problems as well. When it came to voting, Catholics faced problems with fair representation. For example, the 1961 census states that the population of Londonderry was 53 744 . Out of this 36 049 were Catholics and 17 695 were Protestants. After voting restrictions were applied, 14 325 votes were Catholics and 9 235 were Protestant votes. Most of the Protestants were given votes because of voting restrictions. If you lived in a council house or owned your own house then you were entitled to one vote and if you owned your own business then you were entitled to an extra vote.. ...read more.

Middle

Looking at source D the evidence clearly shows Catholics had a problem with housing. The picture shows one house with conditions that some Catholics would have faced. It suggests that there was no running water or a bathroom or toilet inside. The old man and the young child could be showing problems with overcrowding because it could mean they are part of an extended family living together. This meant less votes which was important. Poor housing saw many Catholics join the Civil Rights Movement. The Catholics of Londonderry faced difficulties in gaining work. From 1966 to 1967 (one year) unemployment went up by 10%. The Government did little to bring employment to Londonderry. New factories were put up in the east, where unemployment and population was law. Londonderry was west where unemployment and population was high. Londonderry had a population of 53 762 in 1961 compared to Larne's 16 350. Larne had 40square feet of factory space. This stopped the Catholics from potential work they would get if more factory space was made available. ...read more.

Conclusion

On January 30th 192 was the date of some very famous fighting's. The fighting in Northern Ireland had reached a new level. Although marches had been banned by the Government after internment the Civil Rights Association planned a march to protest against the internment. As the unarmed marchers approached the barriers which the army had put across the road to stop them leaving the Bogside, stones and insults were thrown at the military and Snatch squads of paratroopers went into the crowd to make arrests. In doing so the violence increased and the soldiers s fired their weapons. Thirteen unarmed civilians died and many more were injured. This event again drove a deeper wedge between the catholic community and the ruling authorities. Northern Ireland was then put under the direct rule of Westminster and the Catholics were not impressed. They decided to work harder for their rights. Many factors helped to make Londonderry a centre for the civil rights movement. Both long term and short term help attract attention to the area. gh ?? ?? ?? ?? Sara Moore ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Catholic discrimination in Northern Ireland in terms of Housing and Employment

    5 star(s)

    For example, in June 1968, Nationalist MP Austin Currie protested about a 19 year old girl (Emily Beattie) being allocated a council house over a Catholic family who needed it more. She had been given priority because she was the secretary of a Unionist MP.

  2. Conflict in Ireland

    As a result, Catholic housewives would attend to their every need; they would even supply food and drink, which contributed to the Protestants negative mind set. Protestants began to feel betrayed by Britain and started to resent both the British and the Catholics.

  1. What was the impact of the British army moving into Northern Ireland?

    A couple of month's later serious riots broke out on the Ballymurphy Estate in West Belfast. These were between the Orange men and the Catholic rioters who then attacked soldiers when they came. Six hundred British troops were moved in to keep the peace and were closely followed by five Saracen armoured cars.

  2. What were the short and long term effects of the hunger-strikes in Northern Ireland?

    After visiting the prison the leader of the Catholic Church in Ireland, Cardinal Tomas O Fiaich described the conditions as similar "to the plight of people living in sewer-pipes in the slums of Calcutta"14. In the face of a lack of response from the Government to this escalation the republican prisoners began hunger-striking in October 1980.

  1. Explain the Emergence of the Civil Rights Movement in Northern Ireland in 1967

    Many innocent protesters quote on how they were attacked out of the blue by on and off duty policemen; "they attacked men, women and children with clubs and about 100 had to go to hospital for treatment" says a civil rights leader in 1968.

  2. Free essay

    troubles in northern ireland

    The source does tell us that B Devlin adapted this source giving us evidence that she may have taken this source from a school girl but then possibly changed the source to create an even more anti-protestant view therefore making it biased.

  1. History Coursework: The continuing problems in Northern Ireland

    The consequences that followed the event were ones that would lead to a huge increase in the problems for Northern Ireland. The IRA was so enraged at the killing of the Catholic marchers, that they began a bombing campaign against the British troops who they had once welcomed into the country.

  2. The History of Conflict in Ireland.

    Tell me about Kenyatta. Tell me about Nelson Mandela. Tell me about Yasser Arafat." Adams would say that he belongs to a proud political tradition where the politically oppressed have no other means than the means of their own violence to get to that negotiating table, to make it a level playing field.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work