• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

An Analysis Of The Techniques Used In The “Dream Speech” By Martin Luther King

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

An Analysis Of The Techniques Used In The "Dream Speech" By Martin Luther King Martin Luther King was born in Atlanta, Georgia, on January 15, 1929. He entered Morehouse College at the age of 15 and was ordained a Baptist minister at the age of 18. Graduating from Crozer Theological Seminary as class president in 1951, he then did postgraduate work at Boston University. Martin Luther King's studies at Crozer and Boston led him to explore the works of the Indian nationalist Mohandas K. ...read more.

Middle

On a visit to India in 1959 King was able to work out more clearly his understanding of Satyagraha, Gandhi's principle of non-violent persuasion, which King had determined to use as his main instrument of social protest. The next year he gave up his pastorate in Montgomery to become copastor (with his father) of the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, a strategic move that enabled him to participate more effectively in the national leadership of the burgeoning civil rights movement. ...read more.

Conclusion

"But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation", this is again relating to money as a way of describing the state of affairs. These were that the black Americans would refuse to give up until they got what they wanted as they believed if they didn't give up hope then surely they would win their battle. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE USA 1941-80 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE USA 1941-80 essays

  1. Film analysis- Anna And The King

    So when Anna, a foreigner comes to Siam, audiences understand that cultural conflicts are bond to occur between them. The setting provides a clue to what will happen in the story. The points of view also help to convey the theme.

  2. Martin Luther King Jr.

    From tiny acorns might trees grow, King started the revolution and others have adopted his theories that have seen dramatic results. There were no mass race riots in America in over two decades until 1992 which saw the first racially based riots erupt in Los Angeles and other cities after a jury acquits L.A.

  1. The art of persuasion.

    This was the last paragraph from Martin Luther King Jr.'s speech, and by using pathos, King successfully used the emotions of the audience to create a lasting impression in his speech. Similarly to Bush's speech, King used the contrast in the extract to appeal to the audience's hearts.

  2. English Speech - Biographies and Autobiographies.

    After studying Mahatma Gandhi throughout college, Martin new the only way he could achieve freedom was through peace. Martin met Coretta his wife to be in 1952 on a blind date organized by one of his close friends, Mary Powell.

  1. Martin Luther King and his work

    Malcolm Little's path to being a famous leader was very unpredictable. From a childhood of poverty to a teenage life of minor crimes, Malcolm landed himself in jail. This is where he came into contact with the teachings of a little known Black Muslim leader by the name of Elijah Muhammad.

  2. Martin Luther King.

    His passive protests "appealed to Christian brotherhood and American idealism and created positive impression on people both inside and outside the South" to such an extent that he was elected as the president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC)

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work