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Anti-Semitism in Germany before and after 1933

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Introduction

Anti-Semitism in Germany 1. For what problems were the Jews treated as scapegoats by the Nazi Party in 1929 - 33? The Nazi Party treated the Jews as scapegoats for anything unfortunate that had happened involving Germany in the years after the outbreak of the First World War. Hitler accused the Jews of undermining the war effort, and attempting to ruin the war effort - really saying they did not show enough patriotism to be true believers in Germany. Among the Politicians who signed the 'Treaty of Versailles' there were some Jews, the most prominent of which was Walter Rathenau. Hitler therefore used these Jewish Politicians as a target to pass the blame for all of Germany's problems and hindrances that had been due to this treaty. In reality the aforementioned politicians had to sign the treaty, because if they had not Germany would have been invaded. Due to the propaganda of the time, most German citizens thought that they were winning the war when the treaty was signed, and so were very willing to join in and blame someone for the devastation that the treaty caused them. Hitler claimed that the new Weimar Republic was a Jewish conspiracy. ...read more.

Middle

This meant that they were never viewed as citizens of a country but just as Jews. In 1929 the Nazis only had 2 and a half percent of the vote given, therefore their leaders would not have been very influential at that time. Hitler lived in Vienna for a time where there were many Jews following the Russian Pogroms. He became bankrupt and in debt to Jewish moneylenders so he learned to hate the Jews, and his prejudice grew more than those around him due to his experiences. He developed very extremist views. He thought that the Jews were an inferior race who had polluted the German blood. He believed that something would have to be done to sort out the Jewish situation in Germany, and therefore tried to spread his beliefs. Hitler therefore wrote a book called 'Mein Kampf', which announced his hatred towards Jews and his thoughts about them. This had very little circulation before the Wall Street crash, but after the Wall Street crash, when people were willing to listen to extremist views, the circulation rose. The general history of anti-semitism across Europe and Germany helped produce Hitler's views as expressed in 'Mein Kampf'. ...read more.

Conclusion

However when Hitler invaded Poland he gained a huge population of this inferior race, which he had to deal with. Hitler had a problem on his hand. What should he do with all the Jews under his control? He decided to put them all into concentration camps and the Holocaust; one of the most terrible crimes of all time was started. Also, when the campaign in Russia failed things started to get worse for Hitler and he had to have even more Jews killed. Without the long-standing prejudice against the Jews Hitler could never have used them as scapegoats for the German problems. He would never have developed his twisted hatred of the Jews as expressed in his book either. Hitler was then able to make things worse for the Jews, de-sensitising the public to the atrocities against the Jews. When everything did not go quite according to Hitler's plans he had to get rid of the Jews and concentration camps were his solution. I therefore feel that the main factor in explaining the holocaust was Hitler's attitude towards the Jews. However, I also believe that all of these reasons were required to provide the necessary conditions for the Holocaust to occur. ?? ?? ?? ?? History Coursework 1 Joshua Kidd ...read more.

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