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Assess the importance of the events that occurred between 1894 and 1905 to the decline of the Romanov Dynasty

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Introduction

Assess the importance of the events that occurred between 1894 and 1905 to the decline of the Romanov Dynasty Make reference to: 1. The role of the Tsar 2. Nicholas' personal attributes 3. Russo-Japanese War 4. Bloody Sunday The execution of Tsar Nicholas II and his family in July 1918 signalled the brutal end of a Romanov Dynasty that had survived for hundreds of years in Russia. Such a dynasty had relied on a system known as 'Tsarism'- that is, having a single man ruling the entire Russian empire. Whilst the revolution of 1918 is often seen as being the sole, definitive end to this dictatorial system it was in truth, the final blow in a long sequence of ill-fated events. The Romanov Dynasty had been in rapid decline for a number of years, with inopportune events first beginning to accumulate between the years 1894-1905. The significance and importance of such events differ greatly in the way they contributed to the decline of the Romanov Dynasty. ...read more.

Middle

He was completely oblivious to the state of affairs in Russia at the time and his ignorance of the conditions faced by the peasants was almost astonishing. Once again, Nicholas' personal characteristics play quite an important role in the decline of the dynasty as he had the power to basically do what we wished - whether that was issuing orders or introducing new laws, taxes etc.. Had Nicholas the vision, or perhaps intelligence, to foresee that the role of a 20th Century Tsar would need some alterations, the whole scenario could have been reversed and the dynasty would have never even begun to decline. The people would have still loved him and his position would not be at risk. What Nicholas did not realize was that in order for the dynasty to survive and flourish, it was him who needed to change and become more compatible - not the system. Nicholas character further thwarts his chance to stop the decline by trying to maintain a 'benevolent dictator' status. ...read more.

Conclusion

Even though the defeat was down more to unmanageable factors i.e. the sheer size of Russia, Nicholas was forced to bear the brunt of much criticism. The events of January 22 1905 have gone in history as 'Bloody Sunday' - a day where Nicholas II's soldiers fired upon hundreds of peaceful and religious marchers. This event is undoubtedly the most important of the above four in the decline of the Romanov Dynasty. Up until this day, the people had been growing annoyed with the Tsar but still did not have any real incentives to revolt. The massacre that took place basically destroyed the Tsar's reputation - even though he had no say in the actual events that unfolded. It was the first time that he was truly seen to be at blame as people began to realize that this man who they idolized, didn't really even know they existed (let alone were being killed!) It was highly significant in accelerating the decline of the Romanov Dynasty. ...read more.

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