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At the present moment Helen Cusker is 73 years old. She came

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At the present moment Helen Cusker is 73 years old. She came into the world in her mother's kitchen floor on the 5th January 1931. In those days children were rarely born in a hospital as home births were very common. A neighbour stepped in and acted as a midwife to deliver the baby. It was a long and painful labour which lasted seventy-two hours. From the day Helen was born, she stayed in Yorkhill, a small area near Partick in Glasgow's west end. Admittedly it was not the best area to grow up in but there was a real sense of friendship and reliability within her small community. The street Helen grew up in was the only Street in the area with cobbles on the road. Unfortunately no houses stand there any more as it is now part of the Yorkhill fire station now. The original buildings were demolished to make way for the fire station in 1953. ...read more.


She worked there for 9 years. During this time she had many hobbies and interests one of which was hiking. She often walked for miles upon miles and settled down for the night in a local youth hostel. Her walks often took her to places like Artgarten and Aberfoyle. She also climbed Ben Arthur, (locally nicknamed "The Cobbler") which is located between Arrochar and Artgarten at the head of Loch Long. The Cobbler was a long, treacherous and dangerous climb to its 1500 meter summit. Unguided and kitted out with very basic climbing equipment, Helen stumbled up at a steady pace. After the nine years she spent at the Printing Company she started dating her husband to be, James Cusker. They dated for two years and then got engaged at the 1953 Coronation Cup at Celtic park. They got married a year later at St Simons RC church in Partick, just a few minutes from Yorkhill. ...read more.


They have already completed the west highland way, which is a 95 mile walk from Milngavie in the northern outskirts of Glasgow to Fort William the capital of the west highlands, on three separate occasions. Each time took them just under one week which meant they were walking at an average speed of 14 miles per day before camping overnight at a nearby campsite. Helen surprised everyone when she kept up with them for most of the walk. She enjoys walking and any outdoor activity that she can participate in. When they go camping, they usually go to remote countryside villages like Arrochar where the old enthusiastic hiker used to enjoy her childhood walks. She has planed to do the West Highland Way again this summer if the weather is good. They are all looking forward to doing it again, especially Helen. Her hopes and ambitions for the future are to keep fit and healthy like she has throughout her life. She hopes to enjoy many more holidays, walks and camping trips with us, as do we. ...read more.

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