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Attitudes towards women and their right to vote had changed by 1918. How important was World War One in bringing about this change? Explain your answer.

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Introduction

Attitudes towards women and their right to vote had changed by 1918. How important was World War One in bringing about this change? Explain your answer. Before the start of the First World War women had failed to gain the vote. This was because of a number of reasons including the Suffragettes being too violent, attitudes at the time and the way hat not all women supported woman's suffrage. In 1914 World War one broke out in France between the Allies (Britain, France and Russia) and the Central powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary and Turkey) In response to this the Suffragettes and Suffragists called off their campaigns. By 1918 women had gained the vote in this essay I will look at some of the reasons why women had gained the vote by 1918. One of the reasons that women were able to gain the vote by 1918 was the way that women were able to work during the war. ...read more.

Middle

Also these jobs did not become available until 1916 when conscription was introduced. Also not all men were conscripted in 1916 because some men had jobs that were seen as essential to the war effort including coal and iron ore mining because these raw materials were so essential to the war effort. Although women did get jobs during the war when men returned after the war these jobs were given back and most women were back where they started. On the other hand many women had gained professional qualifications and some women started to work in professional jobs such as teachers and doctors. Despite all this some professions such as architecture and law were strictly male. Another reason that women gained the vote in 1918 was because of the way that only men that owned property and had lived in the same place for 12 mouths could vote. ...read more.

Conclusion

The main reason among these was probably the way that women were able to work during the First World War because it helped the cause for women's suffrage in quite a number of ways. Some of these ways included giving women more confidence in themselves, giving politicians more confidence in women because they had proved themselves to be able to do the jobs that men had done before the war and because women having more freedom in the world of work had wanted to extend their rights to the same as men. Other reasons that women gained the vote that are not mentioned in this essay but still are important are the fact that women in other European powers had gained the vote before 1918 and the fact that contraception had been introduced in the early part of the 20th meant that women had to spend less time looking after children and more time where they could take part in a occupation like teaching or nursing. ...read more.

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