• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Battle Of The Somme Coursework 3

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Battle of the Somme Coursework- Question 5 This question is asking me to study Sources I and J, and then to comment on why I think that these sources differ about the Battle of the Somme. I shall start by elaborating the whole of Source I by adding fact to theory. This Source was written by Lloyd George to Haig on September 21st, 1916, after visiting the battlefield. At the time of writing this, Lloyd George was Secretary of war, which meant that he was responsible for war. Throughout he is trying to boost morale, and tries to make the Somme out to be a complete success, "... confirmed our hopes that the tide has now definitely turned in our favour." Tanks were used for the 1st time on the Somme, to attack the village of Flers. There were 50 altogether, by the end of the attack, approximately half had broke. They had been brought out to use too quickly and they had problems such as their tracks, steering and mechanical problems. Although, the tanks were rather successful as this village was taken. The Germans retreated. ...read more.

Middle

Lloyd George would not have put in danger his career for accusations against Haig when Haig was alive, although he would shift the blame onto him when Haig is dead as he has no way of retaliating. Battle of the Somme Coursework- Question 6 This question wants me to study all the sources and then to say how far the sources support this view, "Haig was an uncaring general who sacrificed the lives of his soldiers for no good reason." I shall carry out this task by comparing all the sources individually to the statement. Source A is realistic as it does not do any good to Haig; it shows support for this argument. It shows this when he states, "No amount of skill... will enable victories to be won without the sacrifice of men's lives." Here he makes it seem as though that he is expecting his men to die, whereas a good general would go on to say that they would try to their best efforts to prevent many deaths. He completely rejects this point by going on to say that "the nation must be prepared to see heavy casualty lists." ...read more.

Conclusion

At the Y-Ravine it was shown that dugouts there were like homes. At least one has been proven to carry a piano inside, and all were described quite highly of. It shows the Germans were totally safe. The Newfoundland Park, and also the Danger Tree, were prominent landmarks for the Germans as it was an easy place to attack more of the enemy in a shorter time. Where saying "Very successful attack this morning. All went like clockwork", he does not know what really happened, only a good side to it. This shows the lack of care for his men. Source C was taken from an interview with Private George Coppard, a while after the war. Coppard was present at this battle; therefore he was an eye witness. Many would say that he knows more about the battle than the Generals, as he is showing ideas never used in the war, where they should have been, "How did the planners imagine that Tommies would get through the wire?... Any Tommy could have told them that shell fire lifts wire up and drops it down, often in a worse tangle than before." It could be said that Haig was an uncaring General as he did not fully investigate into their enemy's tactics, and also their own. If he did, the casualty lists would be less. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. The Somme - source related study.

    Source B, is the Cartoon portraying the Generals in charge of the Somme as fat, un-feeling men. If the cartoon is true, the ordinary soldier would have his zest and idealism snatched away, punctured because he wouldn't be able to trust his own leaders.

  2. Windsor Coursework

    There needs to be places of education such as public school and colleges. There must be emergency services such as, fire brigades, ambulances, police officers. Of course there needs to be chemist and hospitals to look after the health of residents.

  1. Haig and 'The Battle of the Somme' - source related study.

    The cartoon expresses the absence of the General on the war field referring to Haig. This is showing how he was away from the action while his men got killed, expressing a similar view to the one of Source D.

  2. Haig Coursework

    and a 'murderer' (source 3), it shows signs of acrimony towards Haig, when he says 'I'm very bitter, always will be' and 'I don't think he knew what a trench was like'. This is a considerable bias, and would greatly affect his judgement, unlike sources 1 and 2 which show comparatively few signs of bias on a personal level.

  1. (3) GSCE COURSEWORK ON BRITIAN

    Source B shows bomb raids claiming the lives of many civilians, source C shows bomb raids leaving many people homeless and Source D shows bomb raid reducing cities and communities to ruins. In conclusion, source D does supports the evidence of source C and B about the damage done during air raids.

  2. Free essay

    Bletchley Park

    Winston Churchill was unlike his predecessor Neville Chamberlain, for he took a keen interest of the activities and the purpose of Bletchley Park. He considered it as an extremely significant help to the World War 2 effort, as can be seen from Source F, "Make sure that they have all that they want extreme priority."

  1. Source A is a piece of text written by Haig just before the battle ...

    Sources B and C are both brief extracts from accounts of the battle of the Somme. Haig wrote source B on the day before and during the first attack. He states "the men are in splendid spirits" and we wonder how men could be in such "splendid spirits" when they

  2. "Haig was an uncaring generalwho sacrificed the lives of his soldiers for no good ...

    "Very Successful attack this morning. All went like clockwork. The battle is going very well for us and already the Germans are surrendering freely. The enemy is so short of men that he is collecting them from all parts of the line.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work