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Between 1933 and 1945 Hitler and the Nazi Part were successful in their creation of a new united German Nation, or Volksgemeinshaft. Discuss the validity of this claim.

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Introduction

Between 1933 and 1945 Hitler and the Nazi Part were successful in their creation of a new united German Nation, or Volksgemeinshaft. Discuss the validity of this claim. Hitler realised the need to recreate German society to form an ideal Nazi community, in order to create his 1000-year Reich. His new society is more commonly known as the Volksgemeinshaft, which can be literally translated as people's community. Such society would be classless, a racially pure community, with no division where people had the same thinking, or views and they acted for the state, they all thought the same way, and Gleichschaltung was achieved. People in this community were also expected to share a common worldview and philosophy, or Welschauung, which made the Nazis hostile to outsiders or people who did not belong in the community. As a part of the drive to achieve social conformity the term Volksgenossen or the national comrades was adopted. In order to penetrate the idea of a Volksgemeinshaft, the people were expected to attend parades and speeches, which became a feature of the new public ritual. Ultimately, no regime which failed to survive even a generation could create a "social revolution" in the sense of a total transformation of society, as many of the Nazis ideals were contradictory, and the fact that no one can dictate on individuals beliefs and values. One of the most important aspects of Hitler's attempt to create Volksgemeinshaft was the control upon the opposition in the community, in order to remove threats from preventing his "1000-year Reich." There were many ways a person could oppose Hitler and the Nazi's, from active opposition, those who spoke out against Hitler, to passive resistance, those who opposed Hitler silently, it could even be in the form of thinking against the Nazi's. In fact Hitler always moved quickly to remove his critics even from office, he did this by forcing a person to resign, as he did to Field Marshall Von Blomberg, the Minister of Defence, or ...read more.

Middle

The Nazis also realised the psychological need of women seeking for their identification by constantly keeping a number of exemplary female personalities, for example Gertrude Scholz-Klink, the leader of the Nazi women front. This move, however, contradicts the belief of the Nazis that discouraged women from holding a job. In many ways Hitler managed to create his Volksgemeinshaft, since the number of births increased by 1 million during the period 1933-37, the number of female students at university level decreased from 20% to 10%. All 230 women organisations were under the umbrella of the Women's front, 1.5 million young girls went through the maternity school and the marriage rate of women aged 20-25 increased by 9.2%. At the end of the war, more women than men preferred suicide to living in a world without the presence of Hitler. In many ways, the Nazi policy towards women "did succeed in mobilising the allegiance of most women"12 However, on the other hand, Nazis policy to women "shows a contradiction between Nazi ideology and reality."13 As, while encouraging women to become housewives, the Nazi also called the women to have a compulsory duty year, intended for unmarried women to serve the state for a year, as a labour worker. Women were also forced to go back into the working field, due to a shortage in workers, since the men were at war. In fact the labour force of women increased from 11.6 million in 1933 to 14.6 million in 1937. The number of female doctors also increased from 5% in 1930 to 37.3% in 1939. It is also questionable whether the increase in the birth rate was due to the Nazi policies or the general trend of increasing birth rate at the end of a depression period. The divorce rate also showed an increase, as with the number of prostitutes and STD's, which is contradictory to Hitler's beliefs in a strong-loving family. ...read more.

Conclusion

The primary sources, which do back up the statement was made by Nazis personnel, and therefore supports their own ideals, while the others may have been more likely to e truthful, but they were not directly involved in Nazi Germany, and may have based their opinions upon primary sources, such as sources 1, 2 and 5, and have cross referenced it with statistics, of which could have been manipulated, such as source 6. Ultimately, the different views of different sources has a dependency upon the writer of the source, and each source has it's own degree of unreliability, inaccuracy and untrustworthiness. 1 J Hite & C Hinton, Weimar and Nazi Germany, John Murray, London (2000) 2 Don Nardo (Editor), The Rise of Nazi Germany, Selected Writings, Green Haven press, California (1999) 3 Hitler, from, E Evans and J Jenkins, Years of the Third Reich, Hodder and Stoughton, Oxford (1999) 4 Don Nardo (Editor), The rise of Nazi Germany, Selected Writings, Green Haven press, California (1999) 5 M Coulier and P Pedley, Germany 1919-45, Heinemann, Oxford (2000) 6J. Hite and C. Hinton, Weimar and Nazi Germany, John Murray, London (2000) p.287 7 as above, but p. 286 8 M Coulier and P Pedley, Germany 1919-45, Heinemann, Oxford (2000) 9 E Evans and J Jenkins, Years of the Third Reich, Hodder and Stoughton, Oxford (1999) 10 J Hite and C Hinton, Weimar and Nazi Germany, John Murray, London 11 A German newspaper in 1937, quoted from, G Lacey and K Shephard, Germany 1918-45, John Murray, London (1997) p. 3 12 (and 3) M. Coullier and P. Pedley, Germany 1919-45, Heinemann, Oxford (2000) p. 115 14 M. Coulier and P. Pedley, Germany 1919-1945, Heinemann, Oxford (2000) p.118 15 Hitler, as quoted from M Coulier and P Pedley, Germany 1919-45, Heinemann, Oxford (2000) p. 122 16 J. Noales and G. Pridham, Nazism: A History in documents, (1984) p.582 17 J. Hite and C. Hinton, Weimar and Nazi Germany, John Murray, London (2000) Aryani Prathita Prabowo 1 ...read more.

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