• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Britain In The Second World War - source related questions and answers

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Assignment: Model A2: Britain In The Second World War Which Source is more useful as evidence about the start of the children's evacuation journey? Explain your answer using Sources B and C and knowledge from your studies. Source B is a photograph of children, carrying their luggage, towards the train station in September 1939, the point of which evacuation began. The purpose of the photo is most likely persuasive propaganda, used to show parents that this is what they should be emulating with their own children. Evidence for this is that most of the children are waving at the camera and therefore have noticed it. This could be because they have been told to wave, as a pre planned photo or the camera amazes them. However, from previous studies, children were scared and often petrified, due to moving away from their parents for the first time. So to look that excited would be most likely very uncommon, therefore the utility may be unsatisfactory for the purpose. Another contributing factor to it being a piece of propaganda is that the person taking the picture is up high and wishes to take a picture of a large group. Therefore, he is trying to obtain the best picture possible, most conceivably for a newspaper. All these factors would affect the utility of the source, as the source may not be reliable due to it being bias and therefore would not help a historian understand the subject or era any better. ...read more.

Middle

Nevertheless, when understanding and considering the word Novel, it is assumed that the story may stray away from the facts, as to accumulate more readers. However, it is moreover understood that the book is there for the younger generation to understand and conceive what it would be like to be in that situation. The book would not meander away from the true heart and emotions of the true story of evacuation. On the other hand, the story is written by only one woman and therefore the source is only looking at evacuation from one perspective. Another factor affecting the reliability is that she wrote the book in 1973, 34 years since she had been evacuated. Emotions and facts could have become vague over that long period and the way she wrote could have reflected the sorrowful or morose experiences during evacuation. The context of the source can also indicate whether the source is reliable. From previous studies, it is known that there was tension between different social classes. The host families commonly thought that the children arriving were poor, as can be seen from the line, 'Oh, I'm sorry, how silly of me, why should you have slippers.' In conclusion, the source is an extract from a Novel, written to explain the joys and adventure of evacuation and the tension and sadness that evolved around it. Moreover, it was written to educate children on evacuation and what it was like, developed into a heart warming story. Nina Bawden most likely wished to write the book to explain her emotions and attitudes towards evacuation and due to herself experiencing these emotions the source would seem reliable. ...read more.

Conclusion

This helped to bring Britain through, with a united front, boosting moral, which supports that evacuation was a success. However, from Source H, a desperate appeal has been sent out, urging Scottish people to foster children in 1940, a year after the first evacuations began. This is most likely the fault of the Government, miscalculating the number of willing families to the number of people needed to be evacuated. This could also be due to slow communication and organisation of transporting evacuees, not knowing which houses would be willing. This is a major factor in the question of whether evacuation was a success. In conclusion, the main aim of evacuation, transporting people away from danger occurred. It also happened efficiently and in doing so many lives were saved. From that perspective evacuation would seem a complete success. However, the downside to evacuation was the critical consequences. The conflicting and contrasting attitudes and social classes created problems. As rumours of the 'lower' class evacuees nuisances began to take off people in the country became hostile to evacuees. However, this tended to be uncommon and once this settled a greater community spirit began to develop, changing the lives of those in the country and most importantly the evacuees. This generation of inner city children were brought up much better than they could have been in their previous home. They were all better educated and better fed. This also caused the hierarchical social extremes to deteriorate and due to being in the same situation such as rationing, Britain became united against a common enemy. Therefore, I conclude that I agree that evacuation was a success. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. Evacuation in Britain during the Second World War

    This is shown by Source B, which is a photograph from September 1939 showing the beginning of the evacuation journey. The photograph shows that a lot of people were involved in evacuation and, though it was obviously posed, probably for government propaganda, it still seems that many were evacuated and so evacuation was successful in this way.

  2. History Coursework - Evacuation Assignment

    The government wanted support for this campaign, and wanted to gain the public's trust that their children would be happy when evacuated. The main concern of parents and teachers were that the children would not be happy away from home or safe, and by producing material like sources B and

  1. Why do sources A to F differ in their attitudes to the evacuation of ...

    Many country families were unaware of how city children lived. Evacuees were assumed to have lice and diseases. Some children had no experience of using a knife or fork to eat with. Also a lot of evacuees, like the characters in the source, found that the homes they stayed in were much cleaner than their own.

  2. Free essay

    why do sources A to F differ in their attitudes to the evacuation of ...

    However, the women's view on evacuation of children is supported by Source E, an interview with a father. The father claims says that he will not allow his child to be evacuated and shows hostility and anxiety towards the process.

  1. How useful is Source G when examining the children's evacuation journey?

    my own knowledge that many foster parents were so bad that they even abused their evacuees. This is an example of the novel possibly being censored because it's for children. Therefore this once again makes Source G unreliable because of some important information being excluded.

  2. The Blitz - questions and answers

    Although extensive damage was caused to industrial targets, the German planes were less successful with these targets as more accuracy was needed. People were not affected by the bombings of factories as they could pull through quickly and employment was maintained.

  1. Votes for women - source related questions.

    What this author is saying is that no women are meant to vote, she is also saying that they don't really need to because it is them that bring up the voting men who, if raised properly would be good people and wouldn't make women's' lives hard.

  2. The Somme - source related study.

    This comment is alone strange, because the Germans fought long and hard for another two years after it, and many didn't surrender even when given huge chances. This isn't the end however; Haig later says, "We have proved our ability to force the Germans out of strong defensive positions."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work