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Civil Rights Why did the desegregation of schools become a major problem in the 1950's?

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Introduction

History Civil rights coursework: Why did the desegregation of schools become a major problem in the 1950's? Millions of black people were forced onto ships from their homeland in Africa to the North of America were they laboured as slaves on plantations in the southern states of America (were 95% of the black population lived), for near to nothing. To reduce the attempts of black people rebelling against their new 'life style', slave codes were introduced, which were only applied to them. These laws were continued and emphasised though laws such as the 'Jim Crow' law which prevented black people from voting, serving in juries and also being in the same space as white people. For example homes, public spaces water fountains and transportation. The appliance of these 'rules' to blacks were seen as 'fixed determination' to destroy every vestige of there self-respect. Further down the line around 1900's schools also became segregated, this is when southern states saw the like's of Booker T. ...read more.

Middle

What happened in Little rock, Arkansas, in 1957 shocked the whole nation. The incident brought international attention to the civil rights cause; the media appeal was even greater than that of the Montgomery bus boycott crisis. The whole of America was witness to black student of Little Rock High School being verbally abused and even worse barbarically attacked by white mobs in the streets. Orval Faubus, the governor of Arkansas at the time used military forces to prevent blacks from entering the school because he felt that 'It was the only way to keep some black people from being killed' whist being interviewed by Jack Bass and Walter DeVries after the crisis. Nevertheless the mere 150 police body's on stand by were no match to the larger bodies of white thugs, who were part of the mobs. Dwight Eisenhower, the president of the U.S tried at first to persuade Faubus over a eighteen day period via the Supreme Court but to enforce the judgement of the Supreme Court that separate school are not equal he decided to take action. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion to the conflicts, the violence, the history and the images displayed through the eyes of the media each problem was as bad as each other. However, violence was the greatest problem because obviously from the incident at Little Rock High School you could see that Forcible desegregation of schools simply would not work if the students there did not want it to work. Also the rest of the country and the world showed that the black people were determined to obtain equality however hard the going gets. This encouraged not only the NAACP but many other black civil rights organizations to pursue their cases to out a stop to segregation even though the progress was slow. More violent types of racism and segregation and inequality continued in schooling in most places in the Deep South for many years. In addition, to the battle to desegregate schools it did not however put an end to the problem of racial and inequality through out the USA. Even by 1963 only 10% of black children in South went to a desegregated school and state universities in the southern states carried on preventing black students from attending classes. ...read more.

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