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Compare similarities and differences between the treatment of Jews and Jehovah's Witnesses in the Holocaust.

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Introduction

Compare similarities and differences between the treatment of Jews and Jehovah's Witnesses in the Holocaust When you think of the Holocaust you immediately think of Jews and how many of them were cruelly and unnecessarily killed in the concentration camps. Many people will think that Jews were the only race of people to have been persecuted, however they are wrong. Among the Jews, gypsies and Anti-Nazis that were crowded into the concentration camps, there was another small but important group of people who refused to recognise the Nazi laws of their country. They were the Jehovah's Witnesses. ...read more.

Middle

However, the Jehovah's Witnesses were thought of as individual people who got in the way of the Nazi regime as they refused to fight on Germany's side. When they got to the concentration camp every Jehovah's Witness was given a piece of paper to sign saying that they would give up their faith and fight for the Nazis. However thousands of Jehovah's Witnesses turned down this opportunity putting their faith in God first. The average life span of a Jehovah's Witness in a concentration camp was 10 years. This is a huge difference from the way that Jews were treated. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, the Nazis wanted to destroy the faith and the people of the Jewish religion. The main similarity between the Jewish race and the Jehovah's Witnesses is that the Nazis hated them both. Both races were treated with injustice and prejudice. However the Nazis were determined to get rid of the Jewish race forever whereas they offered the chance to thousands of Jehovah's witnesses to fight for their country. Both races although both persecuted were treated in different ways. Millions and millions of Jews were killed in the Holocaust compared to 2000 Jehovah's Witnesses. However they were a strong group of people who could have gone through the war unaffected but they stood firm and fought for what they believed in. Sarah Williams 9.1.3 28th April 2003 ...read more.

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