• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare similarities and differences between the treatment of Jews and Jehovah's Witnesses in the Holocaust.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare similarities and differences between the treatment of Jews and Jehovah's Witnesses in the Holocaust When you think of the Holocaust you immediately think of Jews and how many of them were cruelly and unnecessarily killed in the concentration camps. Many people will think that Jews were the only race of people to have been persecuted, however they are wrong. Among the Jews, gypsies and Anti-Nazis that were crowded into the concentration camps, there was another small but important group of people who refused to recognise the Nazi laws of their country. They were the Jehovah's Witnesses. ...read more.

Middle

However, the Jehovah's Witnesses were thought of as individual people who got in the way of the Nazi regime as they refused to fight on Germany's side. When they got to the concentration camp every Jehovah's Witness was given a piece of paper to sign saying that they would give up their faith and fight for the Nazis. However thousands of Jehovah's Witnesses turned down this opportunity putting their faith in God first. The average life span of a Jehovah's Witness in a concentration camp was 10 years. This is a huge difference from the way that Jews were treated. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, the Nazis wanted to destroy the faith and the people of the Jewish religion. The main similarity between the Jewish race and the Jehovah's Witnesses is that the Nazis hated them both. Both races were treated with injustice and prejudice. However the Nazis were determined to get rid of the Jewish race forever whereas they offered the chance to thousands of Jehovah's witnesses to fight for their country. Both races although both persecuted were treated in different ways. Millions and millions of Jews were killed in the Holocaust compared to 2000 Jehovah's Witnesses. However they were a strong group of people who could have gone through the war unaffected but they stood firm and fought for what they believed in. Sarah Williams 9.1.3 28th April 2003 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. The Holocaust

    This was the only thing keeping them from going insane. It didn't for long though. Towards the end, things got so bad that people just thought it was a nightmare because they didn't think anything as bad as what was happening to them could happen in reality.

  2. The Holocaust

    Hitler agreed and decided to uses it to speed up the removal of Jews from German economic life. Other Nazi leaders, especially Goering and Himmler, disapproved and were irritated by the events of Kristallnacht. After Kristallnacht the position of German Jews got rapidly worse.

  1. What was the Holocaust?

    to strip naked while a doctor took a very quick look at them to determine whether or not they were essential workers. In the trains the women were pinching their cheeks to make it look as though they were red and healthy.

  2. Describe how Jews were persecuted in the twentieth century before the Holocaust.

    In 1933, Hitler came to power in Germany. Jews were now to be barred from civil services, legal professions and universities. They were not allowed to teach in school and not be editors of newspapers. On 10th May of that year more than 20,000 books by Jewish authors were burnt in the Opera House (in Germany).

  1. The Holocaust

    By early 1921, Adolf Hitler was becoming highly effective at speaking in front of ever larger crowds. In February, Hitler spoke before a crowd of nearly six thousand in Munich. To publicize the meeting, he sent out two truckloads of Party supporters to drive around with swastikas, cause a big

  2. Explain the Holocaust Era In As Much Detail As Possible.

    In 1920 him and the Nazi's made a twenty-five point programme. It contained a mixture of ideas. Most of the ideas were copied from other programmes anyway, but the mixture was Hitler's own. Hitler's own beliefs were similar. He wrote all of his feelings in his book called Mein Kampf (My Struggle).

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work