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Comparison between Ancient China and Singapore Civilisations

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Introduction

History Assignment 2 Who am I? I am Aicirt, a time traveller. Recently I travelled to the view life in Ancient China. Was it interesting, you might ask? Indeed it was, which is why, I have decided to compare two aspects of life in the early civilisations with life in Singapore today. My first aspect would be Technology The main difference between the technology in the early civilisations and present day Singapore is that the technology in the early civilisations was not as highly advanced as in Singapore now. Singapore is very much highly advanced in technology than in the early civilisations. An example would be many Singaporeans depend a lot on electronics such as their handphones etc. Whereas in the early civilisations such as the Indus Valley civilisation and Shang civilisation, there was no such things as electronics. In fact, there was no electricity at all! The next example I am giving is that when making goods such as vases and other objects, we currently use machines to make them and design them. ...read more.

Middle

Firstly, I have noticed a similarity when I travelled to different early civilisations such as the Shang civilisation. The similarity is that in both the early civilisation life and life in Singapore today, people transport by land and water. Even though, the time gap has a big difference, we both share the same type of transportations. This shows that over time, the type of transportation may have had modifications but the main idea of traveling by land or water did not change. Next, I shall point out a difference in the transportation between present day Singapore and early civilisations. The main difference is the modernization of the transports available in both times. Currently now, we have many different kinds of transportations to choose from. We can take the MRTs, buses, ferries or cars for short or long distances. For much further distances, we can take aeroplanes or ships. However, during the early civilisation life, the types of transport were less and much less modernized. ...read more.

Conclusion

They could make inscriptions and inscribe or carve on hard objects. This showed that they planned whatever they were going to do before attempting to do this. This is a good skill-planning before embarking on doing. I think I would like to adopt this ability/skill to prevent rash decisions which may result in several mistakes. Planning goes a long way. A quote I heard several times is "If you fail to plan, you plan to fail." Therefore, the people of the early civilisation were successful as they had steadfast determination and well planning. An example of well planning would be the Indus Valley civilisation. In Mohenjo-daro, a main city of the Indus Valley Civilisation, it was a very well planned city with many public buildings and the world's first complex underground drainage system was there. The people of the early civilisation put in their best even if it seemed unlikely that they would succeed. In conclusion, I admire the early civilisation people for being determined and persevering in doing whatever they do, overcoming obstacles, finding solutions to their problems such as solving the irrigation flood problem etc. ...read more.

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