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Daily Life in Nazi Germany:

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Daily Life in Nazi Germany After assuming political power, Adolph Hitler decided to implement his mission of reviving German strength, acquiring territory for more living space or Lebensraum, and establishing a foundation of a pure racial state. In order to achieve his goals, Hitler needed to create a national community unified in mind, will, and spirit. (Volksgemeinschaft). Volksgemeinschaft could only be attained through total state control; therefore, every area of cultural and social life had to be controlled to achieve Nazi ideals. Culture, the press, movies, and children's activities were among the many aspects of daily life controlled by the Nazis. In order to control information and propaganda, controls were placed on the entertainment and communications industries. Hitler authorized the establishment of the Reich Chamber of Culture and appointed Joseph Gobbles as Minister of Propaganda. The Reich Chamber of Culture consisted of seven divisions: music, theater, literature, radio broadcasting, the press, visual arts, and film. The Chamber of Culture was mainly only established to keep undesirables such as Jews and other minorities out. All German newspapers were brought under the control of the Eher Verlag, the Nazi publishing house where propaganda articles were pre-written for the newspapers to use. Buildings in Germany were meant to last a thousand years and were built to represent mediaeval themes. Film in Nazi Germany glorified the party, Adolph Hitler, and martyrdom for Nazism. In their desire to establish a total state, the Nazis understood the importance of "selling" their ideology to the youth. To accomplish this, Hitler established Nazi youth groups. Boys' age ten to fourteen years old participated in the "Jungvolk", and boys fourteen to eighteen years old participated in the "Hitler Jugend". Both groups' took up military values and virtues, such as duty, obedience, honor, courage, strength, and ruthlessness. Uniforms and regular military drills whould accompany ceremonies honoring the war dead. Most importantly, the Hitler Youth did their utmost to teach the youth of Germany the views of the Nazi party. ...read more.

Middle

By it was a sword. Only invited Nazis were allowed to give sermons in a Reich Church. A procession of the Reich Church In 1941, a secret report compiled by Protestants stated that children in Germany were being brought up minus a Christian education. It stated that the Nazis confiscated vast areas of church property and that the Catholic Church in Germany was suffering from the same fate. People in general Ordinary Germans had little to fear if they remained 'good Nazis' and law-abiding citizens. They were encouraged to report suspicious behavior by friends or neighbors, and there were even incidences of the younger, indoctrinated generation reporting their parents to the authorities The police were allowed to arrest people on suspicion that they were about to do wrong and all local police units had lists of potential 'Enemies of the State'. This list was given to the Gestapo, secret police, who from 1936 onwards were free from review by law courts, and therefore had the power to do as they pleased. Those who were arrested were transported to a concentration camp and stayed there until it was felt they had learnt their lesson. The Nazis encouraged Germans to spy on their Jewish friends, and it was very common for Jews to be tortured and forced to confess to crimes they hadn't committed. Once in a concentration camp, an arrested Jew was treated especially appallingly, with twice the beatings, and half the food rations of the other inmates. Jews Once in power Adolf Hitler began to openly express anti-Semitic ideas. This however was not the beginning of anti-Semitism in Germany. There had been anti-Semitism for a long time in the western world. In the ancient Roman Empire, for example, the religion and special ways of worship the jews had was used against them and very few Jews were admitted to Roman citizenship. Since the 4th century AD, Jews have been regarded by Christians as the killers of Jesus Christ. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the following months, tens of thousands were deported to ghettos in Poland and to cities wrested from the USSR. Even as that movement was under way, the stage was set for another innovation: the concentration camp. Camps equipped with facilities for gassing people were built in occupied Poland. Most prospective victims were to be deported to these killing centres from ghettos nearby. More than 300,000 were removed from the Warsaw ghetto alone. The first transports were usually filled with women, children, or old men, who could not work; Jews capable of labour were retained in shops or plants, but they too were eventually killed. The heaviest deportations occurred in the summer and autumn of 1942. The destinations of the transports were not disclosed to the Jewish communities, but reports of mass deaths eventually reached the surviving Jews, as well as the governments of the United States and Great Britain. In April 1943, the 65,000 remaining Jews of Warsaw offered resistance to German police who entered the ghetto in a final roundup. The battle lasted for three weeks. Auschwitz, near Krak�w, was the largest death camp. Unlike the others, it used quick-working hydrogen cyanide for the gassings. The victims of Auschwitz came from all over Europe: Norway, France, the Low Countries, Italy, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Yugoslavia, and Greece. A large inmate population, Jewish and non-Jewish, was employed by industry; some prisoners were subjected to medical experiments, particularly sterilizations. Although only Jews and Gypsies were gassed routinely, several hundred thousand other Auschwitz inmates died from starvation, disease, or shooting. To erase the traces of destruction, large crematoria were built so that the bodies of the gassed could be incinerated. In 1944 the camp was photographed by Allied reconnaissance aircraft in search of industrial targets; its factories, but not its gas chambers, were bombed. Areas I got information for this project http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/GERnazigermany.htm School text book "Germany 1918-1945" http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/lessons/germany/propaganda.html www.bbc.co.uk/bitesizerevision "Mein Kampf" Hitler's autobiography And other sources ?? ?? ?? ?? LIFE IN NAZI GERMANY PROJECT BY RIZWAN AHMED BHATTI 10SD ...read more.

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