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Daily life in the 1600s

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Introduction

Daily life in the 1600s To understand what life was like in the 1600s, try to imagine a world without the convenience of things we take for granted today. Life without electricity, running water, cars, telephones, bathrooms, shopping centres, and clothing stores--can you imagine that? Now take one of these examples a move further: Without electricity, there are no lights at night, no refrigerators, no microwaves, and no televisions. How did people survive? Life in England in the seventeenth century revolved around work. And residents of that country had the benefits of cleared land, conventional homes, and available food markets. Immigrants to the New World had to clear the greatly forest land, plant and grow their own food (farming), and make their own clothing. ...read more.

Middle

Most people had very few personal belongings and furniture, having sold or given away much of their property before sailing from Europe (cargo space on ships was limited). The settlers learned to make the items they needed, such as chairs, tables, beds, candles, and clothing mainly out of wood. Without running water, no washing machines, and no dryers, bodies and clothes were not washed frequently. When they were, water had to be brought into the house from outside, heated, used, and discarded. Life in the 1600s was especially challenging for women. Their days were filled with caring for the family, the home, and the garden. ...read more.

Conclusion

They felt it too closely followed the teachings of the Catholic Church. Holidays, such as Christmas and Easter, which were observed in England, were banned in the colony. Instead, the leaders of Massachusetts Bay would declare days of fasting or thanksgiving. Sundays were spent solemnly in church listening to readings and long prayers and sermons (religious talk). While colonists worked very hard to make their new lives successful, they did find some time to socialize. Helping each other build homes and sharing in the work of harvesting crops became social events. Puritan women also came together to discuss the Bible or to attend sewing bees. Still, a strong work ethic was incorporated even into the social aspects of Massachusetts Bay's Puritan community. * Staple is a basic dietary item. *A bee is a social gathering where people combine work and amusement. ...read more.

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