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Decommissioning has still not been achieved, despite the Good Friday agreement of 1998. Loyalist and Nationalist communities still show open hostilities towards each other. With reference to the following events can you explain why?

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Introduction

Decommissioning has still not been achieved, despite the Good Friday agreement of 1998. Loyalist and Nationalist communities still show open hostilities towards each other. With reference to the following events can you explain why? Objective 1 1. The Easter rising of 1916 and its aftermath to 1922 2. Civil rights marches and Bloody Sunday 3. The Enniskillen Bomb 4. The Omagh bomb Nationalist and Unionist views vary extremely, even within their own parties. Extremists on either side simply refuse to agree with each other. For example the DUP will simply not sit and negotiate with Sinn Fein, and the IRA will not negotiate with any unionist party. However the majority will sit together and talk, despite the extremist views. Neither side has complete control over extremists. In recent months disarming is a big issue; Sinn Fein is on the brink of being removed from the executive assembly because they have failed to persuade the IRA to disarm. The unionist parties firmly believe that Sinn Fein and the IRA are one and the same. So when an IRA weapons dump was discovered in a raid, revealing up to date weapons, Sinn Fein was publicly attacked, despite having nothing to do with the dump. ...read more.

Middle

Unionists, generally, however, see the whole thing differently; they see the 1916 rebellion as a betrayal of nationalists to Britain. Often they say that 'Ulstermen were dying in the Somme for Britain, but Nationalists rebelled. They continually use it as an example of nationalist untrustworthiness. To them the black and tans were just and saved Ireland. It proved that they had no place in a catholic Ireland. They feel that the partition of Ireland was their only option. The civil right s marches of 1972 and bloody Sunday hold their different views. Nationalists see the marches as the start or reform, after years of suppression and oppression by the government and slow reforms. Nationalists on the whole, see Bloody Sunday as a tragic event, and a betrayal of the British Government. Extremists see it as pre meditated murder of innocents. Both factions draw parallels to the black and tans and the Army. Extreme nationalists see Bloody Sunday as a reason to fight unionism. Nationalists all over Ireland saw the army as a second wave of the black and tans. The Unionists however see the civil rights marchers as a front for nationalism. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Nationalists likewise will not stop until they have Northern Ireland back, by peace or by force. There is no way for the two communities to exist together. Each generation becomes more and more entrenched in their beliefs. When one side attacks, the other retaliates with twice the force, giving way for another attack. Thus a circle of violence occurs, until one side does something so terrible that there is a call for peace. However when the peace comes it is uneasy with extremists ready for war again. The Enniskillen Bomb in1987 was one such event. It shocked all, extremists and non-extremists, on all sides. The IRA lost its 'grass root' support. And surprisingly it was a stimulus to peace because victim Gordon Wilson began a campaign for peace. The war was so terrible that it had caused peace. Firm unionists still feel anger over Enniskillen, but most nationalists feel that they must abandon armed struggle, but whenever a terrorist group gives up its arms, another group breaks away and continues to fight. Continual cycles of violence cause hate between the communities, Even if the IRA is disarmed, it will arm again, and recent news has proved this. The splintered view the world has of the events drives the communities apart. ...read more.

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