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Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939

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Introduction

Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939 Hitler's discrimination of the Jews was fuelled, in my opinion, by a number of experiences, excuses and believes. The Jews were a very successful group, often holding powerful jobs; for this reason Hitler would have been very jealous of them. No doubt throughout his life he experienced times when Jews were in control of him, his choices and his dreams. This, along with the already emerging anti-Semitism felt in Germany, would have lead Hitler to blame the Jews for many situations. When Hitler came to power I feel that he used the Jews as a scapegoat that would unite the German population. With a common enemy it would be easier for Hitler to indoctrinate the German people with nationalist propaganda. What began as a subtle dislike for Jewish people soon became a real hatred, possibly because when arguing so passionately about Jews being the scum of the earth, the Nazis deluded themselves into a deeper believe. Hitler soon wished for a racially-pure state leading to the obvious discrimination of Germany's minorities, in particular the Jews. ...read more.

Middle

Unfortunately they didn't. In 1935 the N�rnberg Laws were introduced, legalising the appalling prejudice of the Nazis. They not only gave a legal definition of a Jew and an Aryan, but also stated Jews were no longer German citizens. Meaning they were deprived of basic human rights. They could no longer vote and could not marry or have sexual relations with Aryans; they were reduced to subjects of the state. Making the Jews different to the Germans and forcing them not to belong was a key step to reaching the extermination of the Jews. It meant Germans were forced to discriminate against Jews, as if not they would be breaking the law. Also, as the Jews were no longer citizens it probably meant the other Germans could distance themselves, and therefore would find it easier to be outwardly prejudiced. The laws were very clever at forcing the German population to abide by the severe Nazi beliefs. They made it illegal to not be anti-Semitic, so not reporting these barbaric laws was illegal. No matter how strongly the German people disagreed with the laws it was their life at stake if them ignored them. ...read more.

Conclusion

This blatant act of prejudice is where the Jew's began to realise the extent of what was happening to them, however by now it was far too late. 1939 saw the outbreak of the war, and Jew's were seen as threats. They were expected to side against the Germans and so were made to have Jewish identity cards and wear a Jewish star of David. Any crime now committed by a Jew was seen as a capital crime- the extermination had, in effect, begun. Each one of Hitler's policies took time and this was the key to his success; he never rushed what he was doing. A subtle increase in laws and extremity meant they went practically unnoticed for possibly two years. The Germans were eased into this outrageously severe state not realising quite how powerful Hitler would one day be. Hitler's self-belief grew with every achievement stepping up his game after every unnoticed victory. When the policies became visible it was too late for anything to be done and the discrimination of the Jew's was in full swing. After the war, joint guilt was felt by the European countries that could have, and should have, stepped in to prevent this great tragedy. ...read more.

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