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Describe How Jews Were Discriminated Against in Germany from 1933 to 1939

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Introduction

Describe How Jews Were Discriminated Against in Germany from 1933 to 1939 From 1933 onwards Jews in Germany felt growing discrimination towards them from both the Government and the people. In 1933 Jews felt their first attacks from the SA just a few months after the Nazis came into power. There is then an official boycott of all jewish shops and businesses however this is met with little response and is stopped after just one day, despite being unsuccessful this is the first of many attempts to exclude Jews from German economic life. The first official law restricting jews from employment the comes in April of 1993 "law for the restoration of the professional civil service" banning jews from employment in all civil service sectors, it was the first anti-semitic law to be passed in Germany for sixty years and marks the major law to curtail the rights of Jews. ...read more.

Middle

to be separated from the rest of German society they had their citizenship stripped from them and were banned from having relationships with Aryans. After these shocking laws were passed Germany had a quiet year in 1936 to help the economy and foreign relations but also because they were put on the world's centre stage when Berlin hosted the Olympic Games, they removed anti-jewish signs from Berlin's central areas in an attempt to give a good image of Germany however all German competitors were aryans and Hitler refusing to shake African American gold medal winner Jesse Owens's hand. In 1937 at the Nuremberg Rally Hitler resumed his attacks on the jews by making a fierce attacking speech. In March of 1938 the Anschluss or union with Austria gave Germany another 150,000 jews, 45,000 of them were forced to emigrate immediately. ...read more.

Conclusion

Never before had Jews felt such rampant anti-semitism in Germany and many historians as the beginning of the final solution. Later that month decrees further excluded jewish people from society they were banned from all trades, shops and businesses. Excluded from schools, universities, cinemas and sports facilities. Public business contracts were also banned from being awarded to jews. They truly were second class citizens now. In January of 1914 there is an exodus of jews out of Germany encouraged and helped by the Reich Central Office for Jewish Emigration. Looking back we can see the jews gradually being stripped of their basic rights beginning with exclusion from certain occupations then to segregation from aryans and ending with violence from the public and almost total detachment from German society. ...read more.

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