• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939 Hitler came into power in 1933, with the rising Semitism against the Jews it was not difficult for him to gain control over the German population. Hitler's first move was to attack the Jewish population by removing their civil rights. On April 1st, 1933, a week after Hitler became chancellor of Germany, he ordered a boycott of Jewish shops and businesses, meaning German shoppers were told not to buy from Jewish stores. But the Boycott wasn't taken seriously by the German shoppers and many just ignored it, so it was called off after just three days. However, the unsuccessful boycott was a start for Hitler, and he followed it on with a rapid series of laws which robbed the Jews of many rights. Following the Boycott "The Law of the Restoration of the Civil Service" was introduced which made 'Aryanism' a necessary requirement in order to hold a civil service position. ...read more.

Middle

As said my the name (the night of broken glass) not only were hundreds of synagogues burned, but windows of Jewish shops were smashed, and it all happened within a single night, it happened all over Germany and Austria. Kristallnacht was the result of more than five years of discrimination and persecution. The consequences of this violence were disastrous; it marked the beginning of a horrific era for the Jews. Not only did most of them loose their businesses, they were forced to pay a huge fine for the destruction. German Nazis' blamed the Jews for the night of Kristallnacht. In 1938 the final law on jobs was enforced, all Jews were forced to close down and sell their businesses, many were left with nothing, and many Germans around them, even their old friends, denied to help them. Hitler slowly persuaded his 'loyal' Germans that Jews were nothing but vermin, and any blame that couldn't find a place was soon put onto them. ...read more.

Conclusion

Jews were no longer allowed to marry or have a sexual relationship with non-Jews. This was only the beginning; I believe Hitler did this to control the German population, making sure they were not 'contaminated' with Jewish blood. But when in 1938 Hitler banned Jews from all cinemas, theatres and other public places, I see this as him only trying to demoralise Jews in their own eyes, making them believe they, themselves were not worthy. To make Jews feel vulnerable, Jewish passports had to be stamped with a red 'J', this was labelling and segregation, however it wasn't until November 1938 that Jews had to wear the Star of David on their clothes all the time. This created utmost vulnerability; Jews were now easy targets to discriminate against. With the many methods Hitler used to discriminate against them, Jews were soon seen to be a pest in society. Many German citizens dismissed the ideas of Jews altogether, and this led to Jews not being able to stand up against their government, not being able to help themselves, they were totally pushed into the back of German society. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939

    Without financial support, most Jews could not immigrate out of Germany to escape persecution. It became clear to Hitler that forced immigration of Jews out of Germany is not a feasible option. There was little passitivity of the German people in the face of the events of Kristallnacht.

  2. Why Did Kristallnacht Take Place? (a) A ...

    a better light, nor did he defend the Nazis- as this would have got him off the death sentence. The fact that he did neither of these things puts him in a more truthful light- so we can safely say that this is a reliable source.

  1. Describe how the Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939?

    The bodies of the victims were incinerated in large ovens also sited at the death camps. In the death camps Jews would arrive at the camp and they were ordered out of the railroad cars and told to march over to a German officer.

  2. Describe how Jews were discriminated Against in Germany from 1933 - 1939?

    to their clothing they were stripped of their possessions and between 1939- 40 100,000 were killed in labour camps and by random acts of violence. Why did the Nazis treatment of the Jews change from 1939 - 45? The invasion of Poland in September 1939 led Britain and France to declare war on Germany.

  1. Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939.

    damage, dated 11 November "shops - 815 destroyed, Synagogues - 276 destroyed, Jews - 20,000 arrested, Foreigners - 3 arrested, Looting 174 looters arrested" Heydrich noted: "the true figures must be several times greater than those reported." So even a chief of security didn't believe the figures he was told.

  2. Describe how the Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939.

    The fact that the Jewish people had a different religion was a major reason ordinary people felt alienated from the Jews and, obviously, was a big reason for the anti-Semitism that they felt. A ban in the production of kosher meat was the first religious discrimination, which took place; this

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work