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Describe how the Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939?

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Introduction

Describe how the Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939? Hitler became Chancellor of Germany in 1933, he was anti Jewish and had been part of the Nazi party for some time. His feelings towards them were evident when he began a systematic attack on them. The Jews had often been the targets for attacking even before Hitler, they were thought of as Christ killers so Hitler's anti-Semitism ideas were nothing new. What was shocking about his attacks were the scale and brutality of them. Nazi persecution was racial not religious, the people of Germ any should of expecting the attacks as Hitler's book Men Kampf which he wrote whilst in prison clearly explained what he thought of the Jews and what he would do to them if he had the chance so the events that happened after he was elected chancellor were not particularly unexpected. ...read more.

Middle

In 1935 Hitler made the Nuremburg Laws which deprived Jews of marrying and reproducing with Germans, this also prohibited the employment of German cleaners/maids in a Jewish house, Jews were now not even allowed to raise the German flag. The other law deprived Jews of German Citizenship this meant that by the following year Jews were banned from certain places i.e. cities only Germans or those with related blood were approved of as citerzens of the Reich from then onwards Jews were not allowed to vote go to the doctors or some public places i.e:theatres and hotels .Around this time Aryanisation was taking place Hitler believed that people with blonde hair and blue eyes were a mater race and he wanted this race to take over Germany to make it racially pure and a stronger country to create it they had to get rid of ...read more.

Conclusion

"Shops-815 destroyed,Synagogues-276 destroyed,Jews-20-000 arrestes,foreigners-3 arrested and Looting-174 looters arrested."He also noted that the numbers that he recorded were probably several times less than the real figures. He was aout right-Historians have caculated that 400 synagogues and 7500 shops were destroyed,91 Jkews were killed and 30,000 sent to concentration camps. Unfortunately for the Jews much opf the property was only rented from German owners, so they had to one billion reichmarks to the Nazis for damage.As if the growing situation with the Jews could not get any worse Jewish children were banned from normal German schools and forced to go to their own Jewish schools, though when they did go to the German schools they were humiliated.In December 1938 the last of Jewish businesses were confiscated. In 939 Jews were forced to add new fist names Israel for men and Sarah for women, Ghettos were established in Poland and the second world war began. ...read more.

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