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Describe how the Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939.

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Introduction

1. Describe how the Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to1939 In 1933, Adolf Hitler came to power in Germany as leader of the Nazi party. Over the six years following, he steadily brought in progressively drastic measures to limit the Jews in every section of their lives, bringing in legislation that limited their freedoms and took away many of their human rights. In this first section of my coursework, I am going to explore the gradual introduction of such laws and measures, looking at particular examples and analysing how they affected the everyday life of Jews. I will also try to rationalize why each law was introduced, identifying what the intended effect was. This first section is going to look at some of the first measures that Hitler brought in. The first major thing Hitler did was to force Jews out of jobs in professions relating to law, the civil service (this was called the 'Law for the restoration of the civil service'), dentistry, journalism, teaching, and farming. One reason for this action is that these are all jobs (with the exception of farming) of reasonably high social standing, so by excluding them they were limiting them to jobs of lower social standing thus reducing their worth. Another reason behind this is that these are all jobs on which society is dependant, removing Jews from these professions means that the dependence of German society is taken away from them thus reducing their worth. I think that the main reason behind dentistry being one of the jobs Jews were excluded from is that the nazi's did not want German people to be in a situation of vulnerability before the Jews so this avoided the problem. Dentistry gave Jews power over their patients, the professions of teaching and journalism also give their workforce power and influence, but over peoples minds rather than their bodies, Hitler wished to be in complete control of moulding people's minds to his own advantage, having Jews in these professions would prevent him from doing this. ...read more.

Middle

Even if German citizens did hear about the camps then they could simply attribute it to British propaganda, no one knew reality from fiction. You couldn't check either because there was no way of going to the camps unless you were a prisoner. Few could believe that a leader as great as Hitler could do such horrible things, it was impossible. In reality however, Hitler did not really lead the anti-Semitic war, he was very apathetic letting his deputies do what they wanted. Himler and Heydrich were both very anti-Jewish and so the war years gave them a free range to put their plans into action. On the other hand, the allied countries would see no reason to help the Jews, although in the eyes of the Nazis they were no longer German the allies still saw them as German, the enemy, not victims After the 1941 Nazi campaign Operation Barbarossa a big ally of Germany, Russia, was lost. This meant that the war became one without rules, no longer did the Nazis follow the code of war, and they did what they liked. This operation also changed Nazi policies because there were 3 million more Jews in the part of Russia they invaded, along with many communists who were thought to be just as bad, thus there was a greater 'problem' to deal with. World war Two and the Nazi war against the Jews were in opposition to each other; in trying to win the Jewish war the Nazis neglected the world war. It seems almost like the N a good example of this was the invasion of Hungary, which ultimately caused the end of the world war, but ironically, it expanded the anti Jewish war 3. How did the Nazis try to exterminate the Jews between the years of 1939 and '45? We have already seen in this coursework that from as soon as Hitler came into power he started targeting the Jews. ...read more.

Conclusion

They also felt that they made the best use of their resources. In actuality in terms of using resources, the Concentration camps were worse than other methods. This is because the camps needed many men to control the prisoners even though all useful parts of the bodies were kept and people worked until they died. In that the concentration camps took men away from the fighting of the world war, they may have led partially to the loss of the war. However, the concentration camps were only really used since the end of the war was expected and the Nazis wanted to kill the Jews before this. This desire was so strong, that when the Russians and Americans neared the gates of the camps the Nazis made the prisoners go on a death march back to Germany to both cover their tracks and kill more of the prisoners. This was therefore a vicious circle of sorts; in aiming to finish the 'Final Solution' before the end of the war, they only hurried the end of the war. In conclusion, although we might say that one method replaced another, this is not strictly true. Whilst the other methods were still in use the next one was already in practice but to a different degree, either as an alternative or as the next step for the most 'Undesirable' of individuals, only taking over fully when the previous method was found not to be working sufficiently well to justify its continued use. Although the Nazis wished to find the most efficient way to exterminate the Jews, ironically the method that they finally opted for, the concentration and death camps probably had a hand in their downfall. Really when it came down to it the Nazis did not think rationally at all, they let their wish to eliminate the Jews overtake their logic and sabotaged their own interests in doing so. By Helen Crutcher ...read more.

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